The world is struggling with a lot of strange, complicated issues, but few are more complex than the one that is shaping up in sports: What, if anything, do you do about female athletes who produce testosterone in the male range — a condition known as hyperandrogenism?

The issue has become another showdown for rights — but for whom? Female athletes or hyperandrogenous/transgender women? It’s a confrontation that pits political correctness versus political correctness.

The World Track and Field Championships will begin in London next week, and once again Caster Semenya, the controversial intersex athlete from South Africa, will return to compete in the 800-meter run. Last summer Semenya won the gold medal at the Rio Olympics. The next two places were taken by Burundi’s Francine Niyonsaba and Kenya’s Margaret Wambui, who are also believed to be intersex athletes.

If officials at the International Association of Athletics Federations had their way, Semenya would’ve been sidelined or medicated years ago. After she won the 2009 World Championships by a whopping 2½ seconds, the IAAF ordered her to undergo gender testing and then banned her from competition.

The IAAF reluctantly cleared her return less than a year later, but in 2011 the federation established limits on testosterone for female athletes and required those who exceeded those limits to take medication to reduce testosterone levels. Ironically, a sport that had tried to rid its sport of drug use was now ordering certain athletes to take drugs.

It’s unknown if Semenya took the medication, but her times changed dramatically — from a best of 1:55.45 in 2009, to 1:56.35 in 2011, 1:57.23 in 2012, 1:58.92 in 2013, 2:02.66 in 2014.

In July 2015, the Court of Arbitration for Sport (CAS) suspended the IAAF rules for two years to allow time to study the issue. Those two years are up, and …read more

Source:: Deseret News – Sports News

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