A drug derived from marijuana to treat epilepsy is on the brink of becoming the first of its kind to win US government approval.
The drug, called Epidiolex, contains a compound in cannabis that is not responsible for a high called CBD.
In its third positive clinical trial, the drug appeared to reduce the number of severe seizures in people with a form of epilepsy called Lennox-Gastaut syndrome.

An experimental drug derived from cannabis to treat epilepsy is on the brink of becoming the first of its kind to win US government approval.

The drug is called Epidiolex, and its active ingredient is cannabidiol, or CBD, the compound in marijuana thought to be responsible for many of its therapeutic effects but not linked with a high. No FDA-approved medications currently include a marijuana compound derived from the plant; only one drug that includes lab-produced THC is on the market.

According to new research, CBD appears to help reduce seizures in two of the hardest-to-treat forms of epilepsy, known as Lennox-Gastaut syndrome and Dravet syndrome.

Positive findings published on Wednesday in the New England Journal of Medicine suggest that two different doses of Epidiolex significantly curbed the number of dangerous seizures in patients with Lennox-Gastaut.

The research comes on the heels of a recent unanimous vote for Epidiolex’s safety and efficacy by a panel of outside scientists convened by the US Food and Drug Administration. It also follows two other large clinical trials with similarly promising results.

Positive findings build

Cannabidiol doesn’t contain THC, the main psychoactive ingredient in marijuana, so it doesn’t get users high. In the plant, both compounds exist together, but researchers can isolate them — which is how British drugmaker GW Pharmaceuticals produces Epidiolex.

For the latest study of the drug, a team of researchers …read more

Source:: Business Insider

      

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