Tammie Bostick, Utah Clean Cities Coalition executive director, speaks during a press conference in opposition to the Environmental Protection Agency's proposed rollback of America's clean car standards during a news conference at the Capitol in Salt Lake City on Wednesday, Aug. 28, 2019.

Tammie Bostick, Utah Clean Cities Coalition executive director, speaks during a press conference in opposition to the Environmental Protection Agency’s proposed rollback of America’s clean car standards during a news conference at the Capitol in Salt Lake City on Wednesday, Aug. 28, 2019. | Kristin Murphy, Deseret News

Tougher standards would cut pollution, save lives

SALT LAKE CITY — Two of the leaders of the Utah Legislature’s bipartisan Clean Air Caucus said the Trump administration’s plan to roll back clean car standards set under the previous administration will be costly for Utah households on three fronts: more unhealthy air pollution, less savings at the pump and job losses.

In a press conference Wednesday at the state Capitol, Rep. Steve Handy, R-Layton, and Rep. Suzanne Harrison, D-Draper, called on Utah’s congressional delegation and other elected leaders to urge retention of the toughest fuel economy standards in U.S. history.

“It is the wrong direction for Utah,” according to Harrison, who as a practicing anesthesiologist said she has had to cancel procedures due to a patient’s unhealthy status because of asthma complications.

While she has seen patients who have beat radiation, chemotherapy and even cancer, she’s seen those who “can’t beat air pollution.”

Both Harrison and Handy were joined by Ben Abbott, an assistant professor of ecosystem ecology at Brigham Young University, and Tammie Bostick, executive director of the Utah Clean Cities Coalition, in a plea to keep the standards in place.

The 2012 rule finalized by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency tightens emissions standards by 3.5% each year into 2025 and sets a fleet average of 54.5 miles per gallon in passenger fuel economy standards by 2025.

Not all vehicles would have to meet that fuel efficiency standard. Instead, automobile manufacturers could sell underperforming cars and make up for that with models that …read more

Source:: Deseret News – Utah News

      

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