Nicholas Weaver, an emergency room pharmacist, left, watches as Dr. Hilary Hewes discuses a multicenter clinical trial to determine if tranexamic acid is effective in stopping bleeding in children who experience severe traumatic injuries during an announcement of the study at Primary Children's Hospital in Salt Lake City on Tuesday, Dec. 3, 2019.

Nicholas Weaver, an emergency room pharmacist, left, watches as Dr. Hilary Hewes discuses a multicenter clinical trial to determine if tranexamic acid is effective in stopping bleeding in children who experience severe traumatic injuries during an announcement of the study at Primary Children’s Hospital in Salt Lake City on Tuesday, Dec. 3, 2019. | Kristin Murphy, Deseret News

Primary Children’s Hospital participating in pilot study

SALT LAKE CITY — A drug used to stop ongoing bleeding in severe trauma patients of all ages since the 1960s has never been clinically tested in children, according to doctors at Primary Children’s Hospital.

“It is one thing that we see often with medications in the U.S. and across the world, is pediatrics has long been neglected just for various reasons. We have seen that when drug manufacturers look at drugs, children just, they aren’t included in those studies,” said Nicholas Weaver, doctor of pharmacy at Primary Children’s Hospital.

That’s why the hospital is teaming up with three others across the country to test the drug tranexamic acid, or TXA, in children in the first study of its kind, funded by the National Institutes of Health.

Though doctors say the drug is safe for children, its effectiveness for them has evaded extensive clinical research until now.

The goal is to see how well it helps prevent bleeding in children; if it can help prevent the need for blood transfusion; if it can reduce deaths in injured pediatric patients; and to find the correct dosage for children.

If a child with a severe head or torso injury comes in with signs of ongoing bleeding, they will be randomly chosen to receive either one or two doses of TXA, or a saline placebo. Each child will then be followed long term by researchers to see what their …read more

Source:: Deseret News – Utah News

      

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