President Trump’s Surreal News Conference Didn’t Do Kavanaugh Any Favors

In more than 80 surreal minutes of what seemed less like a news conference than a public free-association session on a therapist’s couch, the president of the United States dismissed accusations of sexual misconduct against Judge Brett Kavanaugh as “all false to me,” then insisted he wanted to hear Christine Blasey Ford’s testimony because “I can be convinced of anything. Maybe she will say something.” He portrayed Kavanaugh’s Democratic Senate opponents as the organizers of a “big, fat con job,” then acknowledged without missing a beat that he would withdraw Kavanaugh’s nomination “if I thought he was guilty of something like this, sure.” He praised Kavanaugh as “one of the… Read More

Continue Reading

Rosenstein’s Day of Reckoning with the President

Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein was reportedly convinced that he’d be fired following a bombshell New York Times report that described comments he apparently made about President Trump privately last year. But whether or not Rosenstein emerges from a meeting with Trump on Thursday with his job intact, House Republicans are salivating at the thought of exploiting The Times’ story to tighten the noose on the Justice Department. (Trump said during his wild and rambling press conference late Wednesday afternoon that he might call Rosenstein and “ask for a little bit of a delay” so that their meeting wouldn’t interfere with the Senate Judiciary Committee’s hearing of Brett Kavanaugh’s Supreme… Read More

Continue Reading

Donald Trump’s Mind-Boggling Marathon Press Conference

At a rambling, often self-contradictory press conference Tuesday afternoon, President Trump baselessly claimed a vast conspiracy to concoct sexual-misconduct charges against him and offered a surprisingly weak defense of Judge Brett Kavanaugh, the Supreme Court nominee who has been accused by three women of sexual misconduct. “I’ve had numerous accusations about me. They made false statements about me knowing they were false,” Trump said. When a reporter asked why the president always seemed to give the benefit of the doubt to men accused of sexual misconduct, he acknowledged the allegations against him colored his response to the claims made against Kavanaugh. “It does impact my opinion because I’ve had a… Read More

Continue Reading

Christine Blasey Ford’s Opening Statement to the Senate Judiciary Committee

On Thursday, California professor Christine Blasey Ford will testify before the Senate Judiciary Committee on the sexual-assault allegations she’s leveled against Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh. Ford’s claim, that Kavanaugh assaulted her at a party while the two were in high school, became public on September 16, though she’d sent a confidential letter detailing the alleged incident to Democratic Senator Dianne Feinstein in July. Kavanaugh has denied the accusations. Below, the full text of Ford’s prepared written testimony. Chairman Grassley, Ranking Member Feinstein, Members of the Committee. My name is Christine Blasey Ford. I am a Professor of Psychology at Palo Alto University and a Research Psychologist at the Stanford… Read More

Continue Reading

There’s No Precedent for What’s Going on With Brett Kavanaugh

Brett Kavanaugh’s already troubled Supreme Court nomination was shaken further on Wednesday, as a third woman accused the federal judge of sexual misconduct on the eve of a pivotal Senate Judiciary Committee hearing Thursday. Courts revere precedent, but there is no model for Kavanaugh’s future. Seldom does a nomination reach this point without a clearer expectation of the result. Kavanaugh’s fate was already in doubt, following two other allegations in recent weeks. The new claim, more lurid than the others, was revealed on Twitter by Michael Avenatti, the attorney who has become a high-profile presence for his brash statements in representing Stormy Daniels, the porn actor and director who says… Read More

Continue Reading

Brett Kavanaugh’s Prepared Remarks to the Senate Judiciary Committee

On the eve of a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing on the sexual-assault allegations against Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh, the panel released his opening remarks. Kavanaugh will say that he “categorically and unequivocally” denies the accusations made by Christine Blasey Ford, a California professor. Ford, who claimed Kavanaugh sexually assaulted her while the two were in high school, will also testify on Thursday. Below is Kavanaugh’s prepared written testimony, as submitted to the committee. Mr. Chairman, Ranking Member Feinstein, and Members of the Committee: Eleven days ago, Dr. Ford publicly accused me of committing a serious wrong more than 36 years ago when we were both in high school. I… Read More

Continue Reading

Vaughn Palmer: NDP purchase of MRI clinics will simply create more surgical wait-lists

VICTORIA — Health Minister Adrian Dix reduced some of the private sector presence in the health care system this week, buying out two private MRI clinics and hinting that the NDP government might be in the market to purchase more of them. Dix declined to disclose what the province paid for a clinic in Surrey and another in Abbotsford, pleading “commercial reasons” and not denying he was protecting the bargaining position for similar takeovers in the future. The health minister framed the purchase as part of a drive to reduce waiting lists for MRIs, a major bottleneck in access to health care and one where B.C. trails behind the national… Read More

Continue Reading

Kennedy Stewart challenges Vancouver mayoral candidates to reveal campaign backers

Vancouver mayoral candidate Kennedy Stewart has publicly disclosed his campaign donors and is challenging his 20 competitors to do the same in advance of voting. Stewart, a former Burnaby NDP MP running as an independent in the Vancouver civic election, revealed Thursday that a total of 1,195 donors contributed $123,556.95 to his campaign between May 10 and Sept. 24, with the largest donation, $2,400, coming from Stewart himself. Others donating to his campaign include Port Moody-Coquitlam NDP MP Fin Donnelly ($1,300) and former NDP MP and city councillor Libby Davies ($400). Provincial regulations require candidates to disclose name all donors contributing $100 or more 90 days after the election, but… Read More

Continue Reading

Elizabeth Warren’s Ambitious Fix for America’s Housing Crisis

Ten years ago, the subprime mortgage crisis stripped millions of Americans of their homes. Many haven’t gotten those homes back and now face skyrocketing rents. Ask an economist, or any recent graduate trying to afford rent, and they’ll tell you: America is still in a housing crisis. On Tuesday, Senator Elizabeth Warren (D-MA) introduced a bill tackling the issue head on, trying to lower the cost of a home in a neighborhood with greater economic opportunity. The legislation, titled The American Housing and Economic Mobility Act, is perhaps the most far-reaching assault on housing segregation since the 1968 Fair Housing Act. It’s ambitious, pouring half a trillion dollars over 10… Read More

Continue Reading

Yale Law School’s Reckoning Over Brett Kavanaugh

By Jacob Stern and David Yaffe-Bellany NEW HAVEN, Connecticut—On most Monday mornings, the main corridor at Yale Law School bustles with students. Thirty years ago, a young Brett Kavanaugh was one of them. On this Monday morning, as the Senate Judiciary Committee in Washington, D.C., wrestled with new allegations against Kavanaugh, everything here was still. More than 300 demonstrators dressed in black gathered at around 9:30 a.m. for a silent sit-in to protest Kavanaugh’s nomination to the Supreme Court and to support the two women who have accused him of sexual misconduct: Christine Blasey Ford, who knew Kavanaugh in high school, and Deborah Ramirez, a Yale classmate whose allegations first… Read More

Continue Reading