Dave Ramsey says: Using the grandchild for money

Dear Dave, My wife and I have been helping our adopted daughter financially for some time. She’s 25, has been married for three years, and we don’t see this cycle stopping anytime soon. The worst part is, they will often throw in that our grandchild will go without something unless we help. We’re certain this isn’t teaching them to stand on their own feet, but we don’t know what else to do. — David Dear David, You’re right about one thing. It’s time they both learned how to handle money like mature, responsible adults. I don’t know how much you’ve tried to teach her about finances when she was growing… Read More

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Trump announces $10 billion Foxconn plant in Wisconsin

WASHINGTON — President Donald Trump said Wednesday that Electronics giant Foxconn will build a $10 billion factory in Wisconsin that’s expected to create 3,000 jobs. The announcement comes at a critical juncture for a Trump administration that pledged to generate manufacturing jobs but has struggled to deliver results as quickly as the president promised. Trump’s plans for health care and tax cuts face an uncertain future in Congress, while his administration is bogged down by an investigation into Russia’s possible ties with his presidential campaign. Related Articles Facebook’s revenue and earnings climb in second quarter NY police eyeing “textalyzer” for crash probes Trump’s treasury secretary is ‘looking closely’ at online… Read More

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UC Berkeley fights back over epic loss in CRISPR verdict

The University of California is fighting back in its quest to regain control over the rights to the powerful gene-editing technology known as CRISPR-Cas9. On Tuesday, UC filed an appeal of the U.S. Patent Office’s decision last February that the patent claims to CRISPR by Feng Zhang of the Board Institute of MIT and Harvard do not interfere with those put forth by UC Berkeley biochemist Jennifer Doudna and her European collaborator, Emmanuelle Charpentier. Patent rights are crucial to most commercial applications of the technology. UC asserts that its team was the true inventor of the gene editing technology. In its brief — filed with the U.S. Court of Appeals… Read More

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Slack, Skype, Zoom: Remote work the norm even at small firms

NEW YORK — At more small businesses, any watercooler chat takes place in a messaging app. Staff meetings are held via Skype. There might not even be an office. Having a remote staff can be a good fit for many companies. Among the upsides: It expands the pool of job candidates, and lowers a company’s overhead since there’s no need for a big office. But there can be downsides, including the risk of personal and professional isolation. And sometimes interaction isn’t quite as effective as it is in person. Related Articles Drones, artificial intelligence creep into the road construction industry Women leaders in tech: 10 tips to reach the top… Read More

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This Is the Way the College ‘Bubble’ Ends

For the past few decades, the unstoppable increase college tuition has been a fact of life, like death and taxes. The sticker price of American college increased nearly 400 percent in the last 30 years, while median household income growth was relatively flat. Student debt soared to more than $1 trillion, the result of loans to cover the difference. Several people—with varying degrees of expertise in higher-ed economics—have predicted that it’s all a bubble, destined to burst. Now after decades of expansion, just about every meaningful statistic—including the number of college students, the growth of tuition costs, and even the total number of colleges—is going down, or at least growing… Read More

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Smoked out: Antioch council bans new tobacco stores

ANTIOCH — The city has snuffed out the possibility of more smoke shops coming to town and slowly will phase out those that are already here. Antioch’s city council on Tuesday tentatively approved an ordinance prohibiting new retail businesses that specialize in tobacco products and drug paraphernalia. The 3-0 vote cleared the way for the proposed ordinance to become part of the Municipal Code at a subsequent council meeting. Council members Monica Wilson and Lamar Thorpe were absent. “To me this is a safety issue for our children and a quality of life issue for the city of Antioch,” said Councilwoman Lori Ogorchock. The new regulations make an exception for… Read More

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Report: More than a third of California households have virtually no savings, are at risk of financial ruin

More than 37 percent of California households have so little cash saved that they couldn’t live at the poverty level for even three months if they lost a job or suffered another significant loss of income. That’s the grim assessment of the 2017 Prosperity Now Scorecard. The report was compiled by Prosperity Now, a Washington, D.C.-based organization seeking to help people – particularly people of color and those with limited income – achieve financial security and prosperity. No emergency fund The scorecard also shows that 46 percent of households in the Golden State didn’t set aside any savings for emergencies over the past year, a higher percentage than the national… Read More

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Signs point to quotas in possible Canada/U.S. softwood lumber settlement

Canada initially balked at the idea of export quotas as part of a new softwood lumber agreement with the United States, but public discussion increasingly points to quotas being part of a potential deal being discussed behind the scenes. And while quotas would have been a disadvantage to British Columbia’s forest industry previously, some analysts believe they might be more tenable now, considering limits to the province’s timber supplies. That deal to resolve the dispute, which many thought could grind on for years, might be struck before Canada, the U.S. and Mexico reopen the North American Free Trade Agreement in August. B.C. Premier John Horgan hinted at that possibility in… Read More

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Signs point to quotas in possible Canada/U.S. lumber settlement

Canada initially balked at the idea of export quotas as part of a new softwood lumber agreement with the United States, but public discussion increasingly points to quotas being part of a potential deal being discussed behind the scenes. And while quotas would have been a disadvantage to British Columbia’s forest industry previously, some analysts believe they might be more tenable now, considering limits to the province’s timber supplies. That deal to resolve the dispute, which many thought could grind on for years, might be struck before Canada, the U.S. and Mexico reopen the North American Free Trade Agreement in August. B.C. Premier John Horgan hinted at that possibility in… Read More

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Contract with Koch group allows ‘in-kind services’; U. says its independence not threatened

SALT LAKE CITY — The University of Utah’s new quantitative analysis institute could in the future accept “in-kind services” from the Charles Koch Foundation, according to the two organizations’ gift agreement finalized Monday. U. spokesman Chris Nelson called the clause an innocuous, even largely insignificant inclusion in the contract, saying that no organization technically needs the authorization of a prior gift agreement in order to negotiate with the university to make in-kind donations. He added that no such donations have been specifically proposed by the foundation regardless. The Charles Koch Foundation is slated to donate $10 million to the U.’s Marriner S. Eccles Institute for Economics and Quantitative Analysis by… Read More

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