RHONY’s Luann D’Agostino Defends Her Drinking After Drunken Mexico Falls: ‘It Just Hit Me’

Luann D’Agostino has spent 10 years on The Real Housewives of New York City, but the former Countess found herself experiencing a first this season, when she got very drunk and fell — twice — during a group trip to Mexico. It’s a scene that’s already become one of the most iconic in Housewives history. And no one is laughing harder that D’Agostino herself. “It was too funny,” D’Agostino told PEOPLE at ACE’s Third Annual Foodie Ball — a charity event to raise money to help the homeless find full-time housing, employment, and economic independence. Though D’Agostino is known for being able to hold her alcohol, the tequila ended up… Read More

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Chris Harrison on Bachelor in Paradise Drama: ‘Drunk and Stupid Does Not Make Good TV’

In the wake of the Bachelor in Paradise scandal that caused a halt to production due to what Warner Bros. called a “misconduct” in June, Chris Harrison is now opening up about the changes that have been made to the reality series. “I know people want us to say there have been massive changes, but you’re not going to see sweeping changes,” the longtime ABC host told PEOPLE at The Bachelorette: Men Tell All taping. “We’ve learned from this. There will be some adjustments, but again, our cast has always been most important. Alcohol has never – that’s such a misconception that they rely on it. Drunk and stupid doesn’t… Read More

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Affable Ed Sheeran ready to get his groove on in Vancouver

Ed Sheeran July 28, 7:30 p.m. | Rogers Arena Tickets and info: Sold out, ticketmaster.ca The solo pop star is a stadium rarity. Obvious reasons exist for this: Arenas are large, impersonal coliseums designed for the modern equivalent of gladiatorial events — sports. Recognizing this, bands from Pink Floyd and The Rolling Stones to U2 have made mega productions a part of their concert experiences because a band and a couple of lights just doesn’t cut it in huge venues. Renowned solo artists don’t appear without backing bands, dancers and bells and whistles galore. Yet, Ed Sheeran sells out all over the world and performs with an acoustic guitar, a… Read More

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Northern California Best-Sellers, week ending July 23

Data from the Northern California Independent Booksellers Association for the week ending July 23. FICTION 1. A Gentleman in Moscow by Amor Towles 2. The Ministry of Utmost Happiness by Arundhati Roy 3. The Late Show by Michael Connelly 4. House of Spies by Daniel Silva 5. The Underground Railroad by Colson Whitehead 6. Magpie Murders by Anthony Horowitz 7. Camino Island by John Grisham 8. Into the Water by Paula Hawkins 9. Less by Andrew Sean Greer 10. The Force by Don Winslow NONFICTION 1. Astrophysics for People in a Hurry by Neil deGrasse 2. Al Franken, Giant of the Senate by Al Franken 3. Devil’s Bargain: Steve Bannon,… Read More

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Ciara Gets Mom-Shamed: You Risked Your Baby’s LIFE!

Uh-oh, the mommy-shamers are after Ciara now! Ciara posted a fun video (which we have for you, below) of herself on a ride with her newborn daughter, and both Instagram and Twitter got up-in-arms about her, saying that she’d endangered her baby’s life! Honestly … this is a tough one. Ciara captioned the video, which you can watch below, with an innocuous and celebratory message. “I wish I could put into words how fun this was! Going down in the toboggan at the #GreatWallOfChina with my family.” That sounds fun … and like a little advertising for this ride. You see her strapped into her ride along with Sienna Princess,… Read More

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Happy ever after with delightful ‘Shrek The Musical’

It’s rather strange when the only semi-normal character in a show is actually a green-faced ogre with a roar like a jet engine. But then “Shrek The Musical” is a show about freaks, so it works. Ogres are supposed to be solitary figures and when Shrek, played with pathos (though somewhat begrudgingly) by Andrew Ross, is packed off by his parents to find his way in the world at the age of 7, they sing “It’s a big bright beautiful world, but not for you.” He must find his own swamp, the traditional living quarters of any self-respecting ogre. On his journey he meets a donkey (surprisingly, named “Donkey”) played… Read More

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Real Stories of the Trump Ban: Transgender Veteran Breaks Down over Guilt & Shame That Drove Her to the Army

President Donald Trump announced Wednesday a sweeping ban on transgender people serving in the military, a controversial policy reversal that intersects with the advocacy of transgender teen and activist Jazz Jennings on Wednesday’s episode of I Am Jazz. In the latest installment of the TLC series, 16-year-old Jennings attends an event for the 17th annual Transgender Day of Remembrance — a day when supporters come together to reflect on every member who has met their death due to anti-transgender hatred. At the event, Jennings, her parents and the attendees witness Shawn, a U.S. veteran, share about how guilt and shame associated with being transgender drove her to join the armed… Read More

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August Kleinzahler opens all his senses to his poetic imagination

Don’t be fooled by the style: Lodged in award-winning poet August Kleinzahler’s aggressive-expressive poetry and prose is the work of a master wordsmith whose ears and eyes are attuned to the delicate and dangerous sounds and sights of nature and urban streets. A recent 2-for-1 collection, “Before Dawn on Bluff Road/Hollyhocks in the Fog: Selected New Jersey Poems/Selected San Francisco Poems” (Farrar, Straus, Giroux, $25, 176 pages) presents location-specific poems anchored in Fort Lee, New Jersey, his childhood hometown and –on the metaphoric flip side — poems inspired by his home of 36 years, San Francisco. Kleinzahler hears harmony in bluesy East Coast duets that mix memory with modern mobility.… Read More

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Weekend Top 10: Festival brings iconic composition to where it belongs — the ocean

An eclectic festival in honor of an eclectic composer, blues great Robert Cray and a new stage comedy about a Great American bike trip top my Weekend Top 10 list for July 27-30 (and beyond). 1 John Luther Adams: This New York-based composer and classically trained percussionist isn’t easy to categorize, his works falling somewhere between classical, minimalist, avant-garde, electronic music and contemporary jazz. Much of his music is drawn from his passion for the outdoors and the years he lived in Alaska. Beginning July 27, SFJazz is hosting a festival devoted to the enigmatic composer. Highlights include a performance of several of his works by the acclaimed JACK Quartet… Read More

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Books by the Bay: ‘Less’ brings more from Andrew Sean Greer

Reading fiction is an attractive proposition any time of year, but there’s nothing quite like the pleasure of curling up with a novel on a warm summer day. Topping this month’s new releases by Bay Area authors are seven fictional works with styles and story lines ranging from the comic to the darkly suspenseful. San Francisco author Andrew Sean Greer knows whereof he writes — the protagonist of his new novel, “Less,” is also an author. CALIEL ROBERTS/PHOTO “Less” by Andrew Sean Greer (Little Brown, $26, 272 pages) Birthdays ending in zero can really mess with your head. Consider novelist Arthur Less, the title character of Andrew Sean Greer’s latest.… Read More

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