It’s Not Collusion, It’s Corruption

Democrats are planning to make the scandals surrounding President Trump a key part of their pitch to recapture the House majority this fall. But the one that’s overshadowed all others—Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s investigation into Russian collusion—is the presidential controversy that Democratic leaders view as the least politically potent on the campaign trail. The party sees corruption, not collusion, as the scandal-related message that will resonate most in the midterm elections—a way to connect the seemingly daily controversies of the Trump administration with the Republican Congress’s policies on health care and taxes that polls show are unpopular with the electorate. “Instead of delivering on his promise to drain the swamp,… Read More

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East-West philosophy, China and the ecological crisis: Upcoming Vancouver talks

It’s hard to classify the approach to planetary issues that philosopher Philip Clayton will be taking during his four days in Vancouver from Monday, July 9 to Thursday 13, speaking on the University of B.C. campus and in downtown Vancouver. On one hand the acclaimed American interdisciplinary thinker will focus on East-West dialogue and make a presentation, full of hope, about China’s potential to become an “Ecological Civilization,” a possible model for how the rest of the world could shape its environmental policies. On the other hand the Yale-trained thinker will be talking about spiritual pluralism, technology and the future of the planet in a four-day course, which will explore… Read More

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‘Cult’ or Not, Trump’s Grasp on the Republican Party Is Stronger Than Ever

The last week has been one of the most consequential in the Trump presidency. From foreign affairs to the economy, domestic policy to law enforcement, the volume of important developments has been even higher than the standard, already overwhelming flow of news during this administration. That includes the fractious G7 meeting in Canada; President Trump’s summit in Singapore with Kim Jong Un; increasing attention to the separation of families at the southern border; consequential primary-election results in Virginia and South Carolina; the release of a Justice Department Inspector General’s report into the Hillary Clinton email investigation; and, finally, the jailing on Friday of onetime Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort in… Read More

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Southern Baptists Call Off the Culture War

It was immediately clear that change was afoot in Dallas. I’ve attended the annual gatherings of the Southern Baptist Convention dozens of times, but walking around the convention center this week, I was struck by how unfamiliar it all felt. When I was a child, the convention hall was a sea of silver combovers and smelled of denture paste. While the older, more traditionalist crowd was still present in Dallas, the younger, fresh-faced attendees now predominated. “The generational shift happening in the SBC has thrust the group into the middle of an identity crisis,” says Barry Hankins, chair of the department of history at Baylor University and co-author of Baptists… Read More

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B.C. government and public-sector unions strike trio of new deals

The B.C. government has struck three more deals with public-sector workers, after earlier this week announcing an agreement with the B.C. Government and Service Employees Union. Employers and public-sector unions reached new tentative settlements for 31,000 workers, the Ministry of Finance said in a statement on Friday. Two agreements were reached between Community Social Services Employers’ Association and the multi-union Community Social Service Bargaining Association, covering about 15,000 employees in social service fields. Another was reached between the Health Employers’ Association of B.C. and the multi-union Community Bargaining Association, covering 16,000 employees in health care. The ministry said details of the agreements will be made public once they are ratified… Read More

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Court ruling puts pressure Trinity Western University to change its community covenant

On a day when legal experts and LGBTQ advocates across Canada were talking about Trinity Western University, the campus at the centre of the storm was quiet. With school out for the summer, a handful of students walked between brick buildings on their way to summer classes Friday afternoon. Some were unaware of the Supreme Court of Canada’s decision allowing the law societies of B.C. and Ontario to deny accreditation to a proposed law school at TWU over its “community covenant,” which includes abstinence from sex outside of heterosexual marriage. But behind the scenes, both online and in the TWU administration offices, staff and students reacted strongly to the news.… Read More

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The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Locked Up

Written by Lena Felton (@lenakfelton) and Taylor Hosking (@Taylor__Hosking) Today in 5 Lines A federal judge ordered former Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort to jail to await trial, citing witness-tampering charges lodged by Special Counsel Robert Mueller. The Trump administration announced that it will move forward on imposing $50 billion worth of tariffs on Chinese products. Shortly after, China’s Ministry of Commerce announced its own retaliatory tariffs on American products that would be “of the same scale.” In a wide-ranging, hour-long exchange with reporters on the White House lawn, President Trump said he won’t sign a “moderate” immigration bill put forth by House GOP leaders. Lawmakers are expected to vote… Read More

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Judge jails ex-Trump campaign chair Manafort ahead of trial

By CHAD DAY WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump’s former campaign chairman Paul Manafort is going to jail. On Friday, Manafort was ordered into custody after a federal judge revoked his house arrest, citing newly filed obstruction of justice charges. The move by U.S. District Judge Amy Berman Jackson made Manafort the first Trump campaign official to be jailed as part of special counsel Robert Mueller’s investigation. Already under intense pressure to cooperate with prosecutors in hopes of securing leniency, Manafort now loses the relative freedom he enjoyed while he prepared for two criminal trials in which he faces the possibility of spending the rest of his life in prison.… Read More

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Taking Trump Seriously on Autocracy and Lies

For some reason, there remains a public debate about whether the president of the United States is honest or inclined toward autocracy. There’s a certain logic to this: Voters don’t want to believe they elected a chronic liar or a skeptic of democracy and rule of law, and the traditional conventions of press coverage prevent mainstream media from stating otherwise plainly. Yet on a regular basis, Donald Trump speaks publicly and makes clear both his dishonesty and autocratic impulses. Friday was an especially clear demonstration. The president strode out from the White House in the morning, first appearing on Fox and Friends alongside Steve Doocy, and then taking some questions… Read More

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Extinguishing the Beacon of America

In early May, I travelled to McAllen, Texas, to speak with U.S. Border Patrol about the current immigration crisis. It was a humid, overcast morning and Chris Cabrera, the agency’s spokesperson, stood on the banks of the Rio Grande as he explained the challenges posed by the current wave of illegal migrants, most of whom are refugees fleeing deadly violence and institutional failure in Central America. “You have a lot of women and children that are coming here. I’ve seen groups of 20, 25 people that are all women, or all girls, age 15 and below.” Cabrera was anguished about the surge in illegal entries. “We have this beacon that… Read More

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