Area at I-80 near 7200 South where the Utah Inland Port is planned to be built in Salt Lake City on Monday, Jan. 27, 2020.

The area at I-80 near 7200 West where the Utah Inland Port is planned to be built in Salt Lake City is pictured on Monday, Jan. 27, 2020. The Utah Supreme Court decision in the lawsuit between Salt Lake City and the Utah Inland Port Authority will set a major precedent for what powers cities across the state do — or don’t — have regarding land use or taxing authority. | Steve Griffin, Deseret News

Outcome of Utah Inland Port Authority lawsuit won’t just decide fate of port, but set statewide precedent for city powers

And now, we wait.

The Utah Supreme Court on Wednesday heard oral arguments in the now yearslong legal war between the state of Utah and its own capital city over whether the Utah Legislature’s creation of the Utah Inland Port Authority in northwest Salt Lake City violated the Utah Constitution.

It could be weeks, months or even years before the five justices on Utah’s highest court reach a decision — a decision that will have major implications not just for the future of the Utah Inland Port, a controversial project meant to maximize Utah’s position in the global economy, and not just for the future of what the state designated as the port authority’s jurisdiction, about 16,000 acres in Salt Lake City, which makes up about 1⁄3 of the city’s last remaining developable lands.

Whether the Utah Supreme Court sides with the state or Salt Lake City, the decision will set a major precedent for what powers cities across the state of Utah do — or don’t — have regarding land use or taxing authority.

Salt Lake City Mayor Erin Mendenhall, in a prepared statement issued Wednesday after the arguments, said Salt Lake City has “continued to pursue this …read more

Source:: Deseret News – Utah News

      

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