States aim to stop internet release of 3D-printed gun plans

SEATTLE — A federal judge in Seattle is scheduled to hear arguments Tuesday on whether to block a settlement the U.S. State Department reached with a company that would allow it to post blueprints for printing 3D weapons on the internet. The federal agency had tried to stop a Texas company from releasing the plans online, arguing it violated export regulations. But the agency reversed itself in April and entered an agreement with the company that would allow it to post the plans. The company is owned by a self-described “crypto-anarchist” who opposes restrictions on gun ownership. Nineteen states and the District of Columbia sued and last month secured a… Read More

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Australia’s Turnbull survives leadership vote; Dutton leaves

CANBERRA, Australia — Australia’s Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull survived a leadership challenge Tuesday, defeating a senior minister in an internal government ballot that is unlikely to settle questions of his support. His challenger, Home Affairs Minister Peter Dutton, resigned from Cabinet after the vote but the amount of support he gained a day after downplaying the possibility of a challenge surprised many commentators. Turnbull called the vote at a meeting of conservative Liberal Party lawmakers as speculation mounted about his support within the government. Government lawmaker Nola Marino said Turnbull won 48 votes to 35. One lawmaker abstained and another was away on sick leave. Dutton supporters say the former… Read More

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The Atlantic takes a new look at the marijuana debate by revealing ‘invisible pot addicts’

SALT LAKE CITY — A newly published article for The Atlantic takes a deep look into how America is full of “invisible pot addicts,” and how marijuana legalization may not be such a good idea as multiple states look to pass legislation that would legalize the drug. Keith Humphreys a professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at Stanford University, told The Atlantic users have reported suffering from multiple negative effects from the drug. “In large national surveys, about one in 10 people who smoke it say they have a lot of problems. They say things like, ‘I have trouble quitting. I think a lot about quitting and I can’t do… Read More

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Farmers protest California water plan aimed to save salmon

SACRAMENTO, Calif. — Hundreds of California farmers rallied at the Capitol on Monday to protest state water officials’ proposal to increase water flows in a major California river, a move state and federal politicians called an overreach of power that would mean less water for farms in the Central Valley. “If they vote to take our water, this does not end there,” said Republican state Sen. Anthony Cannella. “We will be in court for 100 years.” Environmentalists and fisherman offered a different take on the other side of the Capitol to a much smaller audience. “For the 50 years corporate agriculture has been getting fat,” said Noah Oppenheim of the… Read More

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Surf’s up in California, where it’s now the official sport

SACRAMENTO, Calif. — Surf’s up in California, where it’s now the official state sport. Gov. Jerry Brown announced Monday that he has signed a bill making it so. The new law declares surfing to be “an iconic California sport” — though it acknowledges that surfing originated with the Polynesian people and was imported into California from Hawaii. Still, it says Californians have embraced surfing and made important contributions to the modern sport. “I am stoked that surfing is now California’s official sport. No other sport represents the California Dream better than surfing — riding the waves of opportunity and living in harmony with nature,” avid surfer and Democratic state Assemblyman… Read More

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12 dead, including 1 solder, in shootouts in Rio de Janeiro

RIO DE JANEIRO — At least 11 suspects and one soldier died during shootouts with military personnel and police in greater Rio de Janeiro on Monday as violence erupted in several areas of the city that hosted the Summer Olympics two years ago. The direct confrontations between soldiers and armed traffickers also marked a deepening of the military’s role in Rio’s security. Since the military was put in charge of the state’s security earlier this year, soldiers have mostly played supporting roles to police during operations, such as securing perimeters or setting up checkpoints. On Monday, soldiers were clearly in the lead. “Our goal is only to make arrests. If… Read More

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Trump ready to ease rules on coal-fired power plants

WASHINGTON — The Trump administration is set to roll back the centerpiece of President Barack Obama’s efforts to slow global warming, the Clean Power Plan that restricts greenhouse gas emissions from coal-fired power plants. A plan to be announced in coming days would give states broad authority to determine how to restrict carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gas emissions that contribute to global warming, according to a summary of the plan and several people familiar with the full proposal who spoke to The Associated Press on condition of anonymity because they weren’t authorized to discuss the plan publicly. The plan by the Environmental Protection Agency also would let states relax… Read More

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Michigan official faces manslaughter trial over Flint water

FLINT, Mich. — A judge on Monday ordered Michigan’s state health director to stand trial on involuntary manslaughter charges in the deaths of two men linked to an outbreak of Legionnaires’ disease in the Flint area, the highest ranking official to stand trial as a result of the scandal. Nick Lyon is accused of failing to issue a timely alert to the public about the outbreak. Judge David Goggins said deaths likely could have been prevented if the outbreak had been publicly known and keeping the public in the dark was “corrupt.” When the judge announced the decision, a woman in the gallery said, “Yes, yes, yes.” Some experts have… Read More

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Children suffer peer pressure from … robots?

SALT LAKE CITY — A new published paper revealed children are suffering from peer pressure from robots. The study, published in the journal Science Robotics, found that children feel peer pressure from robots, which are beginning to infiltrate multiple areas of social life, including education, health and security. The study asked 50 male college students to take a vision test. They were shown a chart with three lines of different lengths, each of them labeled A, B and C. However, nearly all the students were actors, who gave the same, incorrect response. One-third of real test subjects, who went last when choosing, always caved to social pressure. Over 12 different… Read More

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Fearful of losing Roe, left pushes Schumer for action

WASHINGTON — At least once a week, they assemble in Capitol meeting rooms for an hour-long strategy session. Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer convenes the gatherings, which regularly include several Democratic senators, a dozen Senate aides and representatives of about 20 liberal organizations. The goal: figuring out how to derail President Donald Trump’s Supreme Court pick, conservative appellate judge Brett Kavanaugh. Up to now, participants say the strategy sessions have been cordial. Yet with Senate Judiciary Committee hearings just two weeks off, cracks in the alliance are showing. Schumer, D-N.Y., who plans to meet Kavanaugh privately early this week, is methodically building arguments that would help vulnerable Democratic senators in… Read More

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