Closing doors: Small religious colleges struggle for survival

SHAWNEE, Okla. — Duncan Tiemeyer chose St. Gregory’s University because he wanted a faith-based education that would teach him more than how to succeed in a career. The 550-student Catholic liberal arts college in Oklahoma traces its roots to French monks who moved to Indian Territory in 1875, intent on developing the bodies, minds and souls of Native American and settler children. “Here, we are taught not only to focus on our five-year plan but also our 100-year plan and our 500-year plan,” said Tiemeyer, 22, a senior business and theology major from Houston. “What are we preparing for? Are we living our lives in a way that is getting… Read More

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Op-ed: Schools should build on the strengths of each child as a unique individual

In two previous articles we have discussed (1) reasons business practices are not appropriate for teaching and learning and (2) the professional responsibilities that should be expressed by teachers. In this article we explain why students should be treated as unique individuals. Understanding and accepting that every person born on this planet is unique changes both teaching strategies and accountability for results. The teacher understands that the aim of education is to develop the special set of strengths, talents and gifts inherent in each child. It is the teacher’s obligation to nurture and assist each child to develop these gifts for the benefit of mankind. Further, the teacher knows, based… Read More

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Della Reese, minister and star of ‘Touched by an Angel,’ dies at 86

Della Reese, a onetime gospel singer and groundbreaking African-American talk show host later known for her lead role in the TV series “Touched by an Angel,” has died at age 86. She died on Sunday (Nov. 19), according to a statement from her series co-star Roma Downey, who shared it with People magazine. “Heaven has a brand new angel,” Downey said on Instagram. Reese, a Detroit native, started touring as a backup singer to Mahalia Jackson when she was 13. She later added secular performances to her repertoire. Her single “Don’t You Know”— based on a waltz from the opera “La Boheme” — became a million-seller on RCA Records in… Read More

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US ending temporary permits for almost 60,000 Haitians

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Trump administration said Monday it is ending a temporary residency permit program that has allowed almost 60,000 citizens from Haiti to live and work in the United States since a 2010 powerful earthquake shook the Caribbean nation. The Homeland Security Department said conditions in Haiti have improved significantly, so the benefit will be extended one last time — until July 2019 — to give Haitians time to prepare to return home. Advocates and members of Congress from both parties had asked the Trump administration for an 18-month extension of the program, known as Temporary Protected Status. Haitian President Jovenel Moise’s government also requested the extension. Advocates… Read More

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Argentina’s navy says sounds didn’t come from missing sub

MAR DEL PLATA, Argentina (AP) — Sounds detected by probes deep in the South Atlantic on Monday did not come from an Argentine submarine that has been lost for five days, the country’s navy said Monday, dashing newfound hope among relatives of the 44 sailors aboard. Navy spokesman Enrique Balbi told reporters that the “noise” was analyzed and experts determined it was likely “biological.” He said the sounds did not come from tools being banged against the hull of a submarine as was previously reported by some media. “We all had hope, but unfortunately this comes from believing sources that are not trustworthy,” Balbi said. “Some sources were saying that… Read More

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US declares NKorea a terror sponsor; new sanctions expected

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump announced Monday the U.S. is putting North Korea’s “murderous regime” on America’s terrorism blacklist, despite questions about Pyongyang’s support for international attacks beyond the assassination of its leader’s half brother in February. Trump said the designation as a state sponsor of terror was long overdue, and he promised a new wave of sanctions as part of a “maximum pressure campaign” over North Korea’s development of nuclear weapons that could soon pose a direct threat to the U.S. mainland. North Korea will join Iran, Sudan and Syria on the blacklist. The North had been designated for two decades until 2008 when it was removed in… Read More

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Eight women accuse TV host Rose of sexual harassment

By Irin Carmon and Amy Brittain | Washington Post Eight women have told The Washington Post that longtime television host Charlie Rose made unwanted sexual advances toward them, including lewd phone calls, walking around naked in their presence, or groping their breasts, buttocks or genital areas. The women were employees or aspired to work for Rose at the “Charlie Rose” show from the late 1990s to as recently as 2011. They ranged in age from 21 to 37 at the time of the alleged encounters. Rose, 75, whose show airs on PBS, also co-hosts “CBS This Morning” and is a contributing correspondent for “60 Minutes.” Get top headlines in your… Read More

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Almost four decades after Jonestown, an author looks back to look forward

Last Saturday, an ever-dwindling group of men and women met on a grassy knoll in an aging green cemetery in Oakland, Calif., just across the bay from San Francisco. They are the remaining survivors of Jonestown, the utopia-turned-killing-field founded by Peoples Temple in the Guyanese jungle. They meet at the cemetery every Nov. 18 to pay their respects to the victims buried there — most of them children — after the biggest mass suicide-murder of Americans in history. Jeff Guinn, the author of “The Road to Jonestown,” released earlier this year, looks back on events that resulted in more than 900 dead “true believers” — including almost 300 children —… Read More

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Dedicated to God, Museum of the Bible opens with prayer and fanfare

WASHINGTON — With Scripture readings, a tribute to God and a sigh of relief, an international array of officials opened the Museum of the Bible in the nation’s capital. “We want to just take a moment and stop and celebrate and rejoice that this dream is coming true,” said museum co-founder Steve Green, who exhaled audibly before speaking Friday (Nov. 17) to more than 400 people in the new museum’s World Stage Theater. “This is a dream of millions all over the world that love this book, that use it as a guide for their life, and we just want to take some time and celebrate and dedicate this space… Read More

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Winners of the 2017 Epson International Pano Awards

The top-scoring panoramic photos entered in the eighth Epson International Pano Awards have just been announced. The contest is meant to showcase the best work of panoramic photographers around the world. Organizers reported that they received 5,377 entries from 1,322 photographers in 71 countries this year, competing for the top spots in five categories and for several special awards—and for some of the $50,000 in cash and prizes offered. Contest organizers were kind enough to share some of the winners and top scorers here, and I invite you to enjoy these wide images of our natural and human-built worlds on the largest screen available to you. …read more Source:: The… Read More

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