The Muslim World’s Question: ‘What Happened to Us?’

What happened to us? The question haunts us in the Arab and Muslim world. We repeat it like a mantra. You will hear it from Iran to Syria, from Saudi Arabia to Pakistan, and in my own country, Lebanon. For us, the past is a different country, one not mired in the horrors of sectarian killings. It is a more vibrant place, without the crushing intolerance of religious zealots and seemingly endless, amorphous wars. This article is an adapted excerpt from Ghattas’s upcoming book. Though the past had coups and wars too, they were contained in time and space, and the future still held much promise. What happened to us?… Read More

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America Has Come Full Circle in the Middle East

In 1958, U.S. leaders stood at the threshold of an American era in the Middle East, conflicted about whether it was worth the trouble to usher in. A year earlier, in the context of the emergent Cold War and fading British and French power in the region, Dwight Eisenhower had articulated and received congressional approval for what became known as the Eisenhower doctrine. The United States had for the first time staked out national interests in the Middle East—oil, U.S. bases and allies, Soviet containment—and declared that it was prepared to defend them with military force. Sixty-two years before President Donald Trump dispatched a drone to Baghdad to kill Iranian… Read More

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Are Italy’s ‘Sardines’ the Antidote to Populism?

For months, a burgeoning grassroots movement has staged flash mobs across Italy to express opposition to the country’s populist firebrand, Matteo Salvini. Its ability to pack city squares with tens of thousands of people—like sardines, as the group has come to be known—has offered one of the most visible examples of anti-populist mobilization in Europe. Spontaneously mobilizing scores of people to condemn Salvini’s rhetoric on issues such as immigration and the European Union is part of the group’s challenge; halting his seemingly meteoric rise is another. Salvini has proved a seismic force in Italian politics, going from the leader of the right-wing League, once a small, regional party, to Italy’s… Read More

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Photos of the Week: Impeachment Trial, Virtual Singer, Bat Clinic

Simon Bruty for OIS / IOC Handout via Reuters The annual Women’s March in New York City, the Tour Down Under cycling event in Australia, a newborn giant anteater in Germany, a firefighting robot in India, anti-government protests in Iraq, the 2020 Winter Youth Olympics in Switzerland, haute couture fashion in Paris, an elevator test tower in Germany, and much more. …read more Source:: The Atlantic – Global       

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Hong Kong’s Protesters Finally Have (Some) Power

HONG KONG—Prior to his second-ever district-council meeting last week, Napo Wong, elected just a couple of months ago, chatted with constituents who voiced concern for protesters arrested during recent demonstrations here. The residents who remembered Hong Kong’s wildly corrupt police force of decades ago worried about what might be happening to demonstrators once they were loaded onto vans or detained for processing, out of sight of onlookers and journalists. They suggested that Wong address the issue at the upcoming meeting. Wong agreed, but before heading to the council offices, he stopped by a local market where his parents work as vegetable vendors. He wanted to ensure his questioning of the… Read More

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How Britain Could Be the Canada of Europe

In the scramble to find a model for its post-Brexit relationship with the European Union, Britain has considered a series of options: the Norway model, the closest of all trading relationships available absent actual membership of the bloc; the Swiss model, more complicated but with more sovereignty; and the Canada model, the loosest of all. But perhaps this has been the entirely wrong way of looking at the challenge. For too long, Brexit has been viewed as an end in itself, not a beginning. At the root of much of the back-and-forth between Brexiteers and Remainers has been the fallacy that whichever model is chosen, that will be the end… Read More

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Photos From the Pro-gun Rally in Virginia

Stephanie Keith / Reuters Thousands of gun-rights activists took part in a peaceful rally on Gun Lobby Day, today, in Richmond, Virginia. Demonstrators from Virginia and from out of state gathered around the state capitol to protest gun-control legislation being pushed by Virginia Governor Ralph Northam and other Democratic state legislators, such as universal background checks and a military-style-weapons ban. Although many participants showed up armed, no arrests were reported. …read more Source:: The Atlantic – U.S.       

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Georgia: Images of the Peach State

Chris Moore / Exploring Light Photography / Getty Today’s photo story is the second in a planned year-long Sunday series, focusing on each of the 50 states in the United States of America. Georgia, the southernmost of America’s original thirteen colonies, is now home to more than 10.5 million residents. Its landscape ranges from Appalachian mountain vistas in the north to moss-covered maritime forests along the southeastern coast. Gathered here, a few glimpses into the lush, and often historic features of Georgia, and some of the animals and people that call it home. …read more Source:: The Atlantic – U.S.       

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