Why Democrats Must Regain the Trust of Religious Voters

Democrats ignored broad swaths of religious America in the 2016 election campaign and the nation has suffered because of it. Yet calls for a recommitment to faith outreach—particularly to white and other conservative or moderate religious voters—have been met in some corners of liberal punditry with a response as common as it is unwarranted. Some quarters of the Democratic party would rather maintain rhetorical and ideological purity than win with a more inclusive coalition. For the sake of the country, the party must turn back to people of faith. We know faith outreach works, because it has worked before. In 2005, after the reelection of a president many Democrats believed… Read More

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Judge permanently blocks Trump sanctuary cities order

SAN FRANCISCO — A federal judge on Monday permanently blocked President Donald Trump’s executive order to cut funding from cities that limit cooperation with U.S. immigration authorities, handing Santa Clara County a victory in a landmark lawsuit. Related Articles Closing arguments underway in Kate Steinle shooting trial Trump refugee ban is stranding hundreds of relatives of Bay Area families, lawsuit says Court allows part of most recent travel ban to take effect Opinion: Trump immigrant rhetoric relies on statistical outliers Contra Costa sheriff pledges ‘full investigation’ amidst troubling allegations from ICE detainees U.S. District Court Judge William Orrick rejected the administration’s argument that the executive order applies only to a… Read More

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Vaughn Palmer: Waffling Watts under fire in B.C. Liberal party leadership fight

NANAIMO — As the campaign for the B.C. Liberal leadership enters its third month, the prime target for the veterans in the field remains party newcomer Dianne Watts, the former mayor of Surrey. “You talk a lot about a new vision for B.C., but the details of that vision have been fairly limited,” challenged former transportation minister Todd Stone during a leadership debate in Nanaimo on Sunday. “Could you share exactly what this fresh new vision is that you propose?” “Why thank you very much Todd,” replied Watts, sounding not in the least grateful. “One of the things that I have always spoken about and I will continue to speak… Read More

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The Nationalist’s Delusion

THIRTY YEARS AGO nearly half of Louisiana voted for a Klansman, and the media struggled to explain why. It was 1990 and David Duke, the former grand wizard of the Ku Klux Klan, astonished political observers when he came within striking distance of defeating incumbent Democratic U.S. Senator J. Bennett Johnston, earning 43 percent of the vote. If Johnston’s Republican rival hadn’t dropped out of the race and endorsed him at the last minute, the outcome might have been different. Was it economic anxiety? The Washington Post reported that the state had “a large working class that has suffered through a long recession.” Was it a blow against the state’s… Read More

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U.S. moves to oust Haitians who fled 2010 quake

By Luis Alonso Lugo | Associated Press WASHINGTON — The Trump administration said Monday it is ending a temporary residency permit program that has allowed almost 60,000 citizens from Haiti to live and work in the United States since a 2010 powerful earthquake shook the Caribbean nation. The Homeland Security Department said conditions in Haiti have improved significantly, so the benefit will be extended one last time — until July 2019 — to give Haitians time to prepare to return home. Advocates and members of Congress from both parties had asked the Trump administration for an 18-month extension of the program, known as Temporary Protected Status. Haitian President Jovenel Moise’s… Read More

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B.C. refers expensive drug to special committee for coverage

VICTORIA — The B.C. government will refer a drug that costs more than $700,000 a year to a special committee for exceptional coverage, and potentially pay the bill on a patient-by-patient basis, says the health minister. Adrian Dix said Monday that the committee will be allowed to authorize coverage of the drug Soliris in certain cases, despite what he called an “outrageous” cost by the drug manufacturer. Soliris can treat atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome, a rare autoimmune disorder. But it also one of the most expensive drugs in the world. “These are very, very significant costs and very extraordinary circumstances,” Dix told reporters at the legislature. “That’s why we’ve decided… Read More

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First lady takes delivery of White House Christmas tree

By Darlene Superville | Associated Press WASHINGTON — Melania Trump, and son Barron, continued a time-honored, first lady tradition on Monday: receiving the official White House Christmas tree. A military band quartet played holiday tunes as a horse-drawn wagon carried the 19 1/2-foot Balsam fir from Wisconsin up the White House driveway. Get tech news in your inbox weekday mornings. Sign up for the free Good Morning Silicon Valley newsletter. The first lady, wearing a holiday red turtleneck and a coat draped over her shoulders, and Barron, in a dark suit coat, white shirt and dark slacks, emerged from the North Portico. They circled the tree and walked over to… Read More

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Facing harassment allegations, LA Dem won’t run again

By Kathleen Ronayne and Jonathan J. Cooper | Associated Press SACRAMENTO — California Assemblyman Raul Bocanegra won’t seek re-election following sexual harassment allegations. But some Democratic leaders said Monday he should step down immediately. Bocanegra, a Los Angeles Democrat, is the first political casualty since a wave of sexual harassment allegations started sweeping the Capitol last month. Members of the California Democratic Party’s executive board circulated a petition this weekend calling on Bocanegra and Democratic Sen. Tony Mendoza of Artesia to resign amid accusations against them. Get tech news in your inbox weekday mornings. Sign up for the free Good Morning Silicon Valley newsletter. Amar Shergill, the board member who… Read More

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Now-California lawmaker accused of groping fellow staffer will not run for re-election

SACRAMENTO — San Fernando Valley Democrat Raul Bocanegra, who was secretly disciplined eight years ago after being accused of groping a fellow staffer at an after-hours event, will not run for re-election in the Assembly next year, he announced Monday. Bocanegra’s announcement comes weeks after the Los Angeles Times unearthed the case — and as women in politics, Hollywood and other industries are going public with their stories as part of a broader movement to fight sexual harassment and assault. “As you may know, news stories were reported a few weeks ago about a regrettable encounter when I was a legislative staffer in 2009. It was a moment that I… Read More

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Virginia delays certification of two close races

By Laura Vozzella | Washington Post RICHMOND, Va. – Virginia’s Board of Elections voted unanimously Monday to delay certification of two House races, amid new claims that dozens of voters got the wrong ballot in a tight contest that could determine control of the legislature’s lower chamber. Related Articles Analysis: Why Franken could be in a lot more trouble now Clinton visits Puerto Rico, distributes relief supplies Nebraska OKs Keystone XL, not preferred route Zimbabwe leaders move to impeach defiant Mugabe Trump puts North Korea back on terror sponsor list The board called a “time out” after state Elections Commissioner Edgardo Cortés announced that in April 2016, Fredericksburg registrar Juanita… Read More

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