The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Why Tensions With Iran Don’t Mean Iraq 2.0

We’re trying something new: a once-a-week national-security-focused edition of The Atlantic’s signature politics newsletter. We’ll tell you what to keep an eye on this week, what our reporters are covering, and why the latest foreign-policy developments are significant. Comments or questions? Send us an email anytime. Were you forwarded this email? Sign yourself up here. The Top Story A soldier carries his gear across the flight deck of the USS Lewis B. Puller in the Arabian Gulf. (Desiree Kling / U.S. Marine Corps / Handout via Reuters) Why Tensions With Iran Don’t Mean Iraq 2.0 Iran’s threat to U.S. troops is “serious and imminent,” according to Senator Marco Rubio of… Read More

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Joe Biden’s Bet That 2016 Didn’t Change Everything

PHILADELPHIA—If the new rules of politics post-2016 were to hold up, the official launch rally Joe Biden held here on Saturday would mean that he is in trouble: The crowd wasn’t huge, was largely white and older, and, for the most part, only really got into it when he mentioned Barack Obama or Donald Trump. Yet Biden’s high-and-getting-higher poll numbers, the early fundraising success that has surprised even his own aides, and the enthusiastic responses I heard from supporters who came out on a hot afternoon to see him don’t show a candidate in much trouble at all. Biden’s campaign is a bet: that in the four years since Trump… Read More

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How to Change Policy Without Politicians

David Couch is a lawyer by profession, specializing in cases against Arkansas nursing homes accused of abuse. But in the state’s political circles, he’s better known as a ballot-initiative-writing machine. He has submitted more than 20 proposals to the state attorney general’s office, written three measures that eventually became law, and been involved in well over two dozen other initiatives, some of which have ended up on the ballot. That’s quite the count for a man who told me that ballot initiatives are his “hobby,” something he’d dabbled in during his early days as a lawyer and only picked back up about a decade ago. But his interest in this… Read More

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The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Subpoena-na-na-na

What We’re Following Today It’s Friday, May 17. ‣ Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin (Ed Jones / Getty) Changes to a broken system: This week, Donald Trump’s administration announced a plan to prioritize immigration for “skilled” workers, such as those on the H-1B visa. In past decades, people on H-1B visas filled a crucial gap in the labor market for high-skilled jobs, but critics say it depresses wages and keeps immigrants tied down to a certain employer for years while navigating the citizenship process. Generation gap: Joe Biden’s centrist record over his 36-year Senate career could be a liability when it comes to attracting younger, more progressive voters in the party… Read More

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In The House podcast: B.C. spending scandal report lands with a thud

A bombshell report by former chief justice Beverly McLachlin into the legislature spending scandal lands. What allegations panned out and what fizzled into nothing? We hear audio from Speaker Darryl Plecas and suspended sergeant-at-arms Gary Lenz. Also, Premier John Horgan launches a public inquiry into money laundering – a much-needed move for justice or transparent politics against the Liberals (or both)? Rob and Mike dig into and analyze the stories. Read More …read more Source:: Vancouver Sun – Politics       

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