The Kingmaker

LAS VEGAS—Swing past Caesars Palace; head up the Bellagio’s driveway, where its famous fountains are erupting to an auto-tuned Cher hit. Walk by the Dale Chihuly glass-flower ceiling above the check-in line, and the animatronic exhibit with the half-human, half-monkey figures. Head past the blackjack tables and the jangling slot machines and the chocolate fountain to the austere concrete corridors beyond them. There, getting wheeled around in a red metal-frame wheelchair is the 80-year-old man on whom the unity of the Democratic Party in 2020—if not the Democratic nomination—may hinge. If he can stay alive that long. Harry Reid, who retired in 2017 after representing Nevada for 30 years in… Read More

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The Next Debate Stage Won’t Look Like the Democratic Party

With Kamala Harris’s unexpected departure from the presidential race Tuesday, the lineup of the next primary debate has become something the Democratic Party as a whole decidedly is not: all white. With Tulsi Gabbard and Andrew Yang yet to qualify, and Cory Booker and Julían Castro unlikely to, the debate stage will be notably lacking in ethnic diversity. For a political party—and a country—whose minority population is growing, this is a problem. How did we go from a debate stage early last summer that was the most diverse in history to a race where all the leading candidates are white? “A media narrative has emerged that says, ‘In order for… Read More

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In The House podcast: Pharmacare, LNG, taxis and a new Green leader

B.C. weighs in with other provinces on a national Pharmacare program, Premiers Horgan and Kenney find common ground on LNG, the taxi sector takes one last stab at delaying ride-hailing and Mike Smyth and Rob Shaw look at what Andrew Weaver’s early resignation as BC Green leader means for the party’s future. Read More …read more Source:: Vancouver Sun – Politics       

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The Exhausting, Exhilarating Task of Determining Articles of Impeachment

It’s an exclusive club that members of the House Judiciary Committee are joining today: The United States has undergone impeachment just three other times in its history, and only a handful of people each time have been charged with compiling a list of the president’s impeachable offenses. James Rogan knows what that’s like. Rogan, now a superior-court judge in California, was a 41-year-old member of the Judiciary Committee during former President Bill Clinton’s impeachment. He was present for all the late nights and early mornings the committee spent reviewing Independent Counsel Kenneth Starr’s 453-page report in the fall of 1998 detailing the president’s affair with Monica Lewinsky. And he worked… Read More

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The Phrase Trump Can’t Escape: Cover-Up

Part of what has distinguished the House’s impeachment drive against President Donald Trump is that its inquiry was not principally about a cover-up. Unlike the scandals that prompted the previous two impeachments, the Ukraine affair was no “third-rate burglary,” nor was it an extramarital assignation in the Oval Office. The underlying accusation of wrongdoing against Trump—that he held up hundreds of millions of dollars in lethal aid to a U.S. ally in a scheme to aid his reelection campaign—is of a different nature entirely. Yet in the 300-page impeachment report released this afternoon, Democrats on the House Intelligence Committee made clear that even here, Trump’s attempted cover-up of his alleged… Read More

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