Photos: New vs. old Pittsburgh quickly comes into focus — and tells a story that’s familiar in Seattle

A new townhome development sits across the back fenceline of older row houses in Pittsburgh’s Lawrenceville neighborhood. (GeekWire Photo / Kurt Schlosser) My favorite thing to do when I get to any new city is to wake up relatively early and take a walk. As a photographer, I appreciate that the light is better and that the streets are less busy. I’d been excited to arrive in Pittsburgh as part of GeekWire’s rotating cast of HQ2 characters, to lend my take on the city’s continuing evolution through both the stories I’ll find and the images I’ll capture. A jackhammer outside our live/work space in Lawrenceville around 8 a.m. took the… Read More

Continue Reading

One-of-a-kind Hive Media Lab launches in Seattle, on a mission to invent the future of media

Hive Media Lab’s new green doors next to an old “On the Air” sign. (GeekWire Photo / Frank Catalano) If you’re going to have your lunch eaten, perhaps it’s best to have some say about the table setting. This new series by contributing writer Frank Catalano examines the evolution of digital content, from creation to consumption, and the technology transforming it. That could sound like a cynical interpretation of the launch of Cascade Public Media’s new Hive Media Lab in Seattle. Located inside the Seattle Center building that also houses public television station KCTS-TV and the digital news site Crosscut, Hive Media Lab is billed as a “collaboration and production”… Read More

Continue Reading

Week in Geek Podcast: Why Amazon cut hundreds of jobs the same week it became a $700B company

Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos. (GeekWire File Photo) Amazon cut hundreds of jobs this week, but the company is still increasing its workforce overall, and market value continues to rise — in fact, it became the third most valuable company in the U.S. this week with a market capitalization of more than $700 billion. So why the cuts? GeekWire’s Todd Bishop and John Cook share their theories on the latest Week in Geek Podcast. Plus, bike sharing company LimeBike introduced electric-assisted bikes to the Seattle streets — we hear first-hand from GeekWire reporter Monica Nickelsburg about the ride experience and the program’s goals. On the random channel this week: Snapchat’s unpopular… Read More

Continue Reading

When Malls Saved the Suburbs From Despair

“Okay, we’ll see you in two-and-a-half hours,” the clerk tells me, taking the iPhone from my hand. I’m at the Apple Store, availing myself of a cheap smartphone battery replacement, an offer the company made after taking heat for deliberately slowing down devices. A test run by a young woman typing at a feverish, unnatural pace on an iPad confirms that mine desperately needed the swap. As she typed, I panicked. What will I do in the mall for so long, and without a phone? How far the mall has fallen that I rack my brain for something to do here. The Apple Store captures everything I don’t like about… Read More

Continue Reading

The Righteous Anger of the Parkland Shooting’s Teen Survivors

Something was different about the mass shooting this week in Parkland, Florida, in which 14 students and three adults were killed. It was not only the death toll. The mass murder at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High became the deadliest high-school shooting in American history (edging out Columbine, which killed 13 in 1999) What made Parkland different were the people who stepped forward to describe it. High-school students—the survivors of the calamity themselves—became the voice of the tragedy. They mourned for victims, they pushed against false reports, they demanded accountability. We are too young to be losing friends like this. — Javi 🥀 (@Javier_Lovera__) February 15, 2018 On television, on social… Read More

Continue Reading

As scientists intensify search for signs of alien life, survey says we won’t freak out

An artist’s conception shows the Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite, or TESS, monitoring a distant star and its planets. (NASA Illustration) AUSTIN, Texas — If extraterrestrial life exists, there’s a chance we’ll detect it sometime in the next 20 years. And then what? A recently published study suggests that most folks will take the news calmly, if they care at all. “How would we react if we find that we’re not alone in the universe? This question has been the cause of great speculation over the years — but, until now, virtually no systematic empirical research,” Michael Varnum, a psychologist at Arizona State University, said today in Austin at the annual… Read More

Continue Reading

Magnitude 7.5 quake rattles south, central Mexico

Associated Press MEXICO CITY — A powerful earthquake has shaken south and central Mexico, causing people to flee buildings and office towers in the country’s capital, and setting off quake alert systems. Crowds of people gathered on central Reforma Avenue in Mexico City as the ground shook. The U.S. Geological Survey put the quake’s preliminary magnitude at 7.5 and said its epicenter was 2 kilometers southeast of Pinotepa in Oaxaca state. It had a depth of 43 kilometers. A magnitude 7.1 earthquake in central Mexico on Sept. 19 left 228 people dead in the capital and 369 across the region. …read more Source:: East Bay – Science       

Continue Reading

This quiz lets you pretend to be Jeff Bezos, picking the winning city for Amazon HQ2

This game puts you in Jeff Bezos’ shoes. Ever wondered what it’s like to be the richest person on the planet? Here’s your chance to find out (sort of). GateHouse Media, a publisher of local news publications, created a game that lets players pretend to be Jeff Bezos as he selects a winning city for Amazon HQ2. The game has data on each of the 20 cities in the running for Amazon’s historic second headquarters project. Without knowing which cities they might be choosing, players rank criteria from Amazon’s request for proposals like “culture and business climate” and “economics and incentives.” Then the game asks a series of questions about… Read More

Continue Reading

GeekWire Calendar Picks: Celebrate Women’s History Month with the Seattle tech community; International Startup Weekend; and more

The TUNE House scholars. (TUNE House Photo) March is Woman’s History Month, and Seattle’s tech community is already gearing up to celebrate and support women in tech. The TUNE House, a scholarship program for women studying computer science, is kicking things off with an event on March 1 — Women’s History Month: Throughout The Generations. The event is focused on the idea of success and what it can mean for different people, from creating a stellar product to leading a company. Speakers include current and future tech leaders like Moz CEO Sarah Bird and Bhavya Manohoran, a fourth grade student and aspiring software engineer. Also hear from TUNE house scholars… Read More

Continue Reading

Researchers study links between gut bacteria and brain’s memory function

Researchers at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory are studying how bacteria in the gut can affect the brain’s memory function. (PNNL Illustration) AUSTIN, Texas — Can probiotic bacteria play a role in how well your memory works? It’s too early to say for sure, but mouse studies have turned up some clues worth remembering. Preliminary results suggest that giving mice the kinds of bacteria often found in dietary supplements have a beneficial effect on memory when it comes to navigating mazes or avoiding electrical shocks. One such study, focusing on mazes and object-in-place recognition, was published last year. And researchers from the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory in Richland, Wash., are… Read More

Continue Reading