Around 20 million renters could face eviction by the end of September because of the pandemic —with the impact falling heavily on Black and Hispanic renters

As the federal moratorium on evictions nears its expiration, experts are worried there could be a homelessness crisis. Twenty percent of the 110 million Americans who live in rented homes are at risk of eviction by the end of September, The Aspen Institute reported. The issue is especially expected to hit Black and Hispanic renters hard. Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories. As many as 20% of the 110 million Americans who live in rented homes are at risk of eviction by the end of September, The Aspen Institute reported last month citing data from the COVID-19 Eviction Defense Project. That project estimated somewhere between 19 to 23 million… Read More

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TikTok says it is ceasing operations in Hong Kong ‘in light of recent events’

Viral video app TikTok says that it is ceasing operations in Hong Kong. “In light of recent events, we’ve decided to stop operations of the TikTok app in Hong Kong,” a TikTok spokesperson told Business Insider. China last week unilaterally passed a new national security law for Hong Kong, a move that experts say further erodes the city’s waning freedoms. The new law has already been used to arrest at least ten pro-democracy protesters. TikTok, one of the most downloaded phone apps in the world, is owned by Chinese company ByteDance. Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories. Viral video app TikTok says that it is ceasing operations in Hong… Read More

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TikTok pulls out of Hong Kong due to new security law

Illustration by Alex Castro / The Verge TikTok says it will stop offering its social video app in Hong Kong after the region adopted a new national security law granting expanded powers to the mainland Chinese government. “In light of recent events, we’ve decided to stop operations of the TikTok app in Hong Kong,” a spokesperson tells Axios. Global tech companies operating in Hong Kong have expressed concern that the new law could force them to comply with China’s draconian censorship standards and possibly send user data to the mainland. Google, Facebook, and Twitter have already stopped processing requests for user data from the Hong Kong government. TikTok is owned… Read More

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Is ‘Hamilton’ better as a movie or onstage?

Lin-Manuel Miranda is Alexander Hamilton and Leslie Odom Jr. is Aaron Burr in “Hamilton,” which is now available on Disney Plus. | Disney Plus Media Relations Deseret News reporters Lottie Johnson and Sarah Harris saw the touring production of ‘Hamilton’ when it came to Salt Lake City in 2018. They also watched the Disney Plus film over the weekend. SALT LAKE CITY — Five years after its Broadway debut, ”Hamilton” continues to be all the rage. Disney Plus saw a 72% bump in mobile downloads as a filmed version of the Broadway phenomenon became available last Friday to a wider audience than ever before. We — Lottie Johnson and Sarah… Read More

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What makes Mark Pope declare BYU assistant Cody Fueger is ‘100% ready to be a head coach right now’

BYU assistant coach Cody Fueger coaches up players during game against Portland in the Marriott Center. | Nate Edwards, Courtesy BYU Photo BYU assistant coach Cody Fueger has worked his way up the ranks in the profession, having served under legendary coaches like Rick Majerus, Dave Rose and Stew Morrill. He’s played a key role in recruiting, developing players and helping design an efficient offense under Mark Pope. PROVO — During his basketball coaching career, BYU assistant Cody Fueger has served under, and learned from, a few of the best coaches that the Beehive State has ever produced — Utah’s Rick Majerus, BYU’s Dave Rose and Utah State’s Stew Morrill.… Read More

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How the West is losing the battle with COVID-19

University of Utah Health’s Dakota Silva, left, and Ashley Cameron work together as they test people for COVID-19 during the University of Utah’s Wellness Bus drive-thru testing event at Centennial Park in West Valley City on Monday, July 6, 2020. | Steve Griffin, Deseret News SALT LAKE CITY — Once upon a time in the West, COVID-19 appeared to be on its way out of town. But not anymore. Western states are losing the battle with the deadly virus right now, and some have retreated into defensive mode after throwing the doors open to bars, restaurants and other gathering spots. Consider: • Maricopa County, Arizona: Two weeks ago — 1,754… Read More

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Jazz mailbag: Mike Conley’s absence, positive test theory and who’ll fill in for Bojan Bogdanovic?

Mike Conley and Bojan Bogdanovic participated in an introductory press conference for the Utah Jazz on Monday, July 8, 2019 in Las Vegas where they showcased their No. 10 and No. 44 jerseys. | Eric Woodyard, Deseret News SALT LAKE CITY — If all goes according to plan, in just over three weeks the Utah Jazz will play a nationally broadcast game against the New Orleans Pelicans to kick off the restart of the 2019-20 NBA season. It feels wild that I’m even saying that. By that point it will have been four and a half months since the league shut down on March 11, and at the center of… Read More

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Billboard paying tribute to first responders vandalized with message warning of the ‘new Jim Crow’

Traffic moves along I-15 in South Salt Lake on Thursday, Jan. 17, 2019. | Kristin Murphy, Deseret News BOUNTIFUL — An outdoor advertising company in northern Utah is working to fix a billboard that was recently vandalized, the second such event to occur in the Salt Lake Valley this week. Alongside I-15 in Bountiful, the message on a billboard featuring a police officer with the words “Answering the Toughest Call. Bravery” was covered up by a new sign reading “The New Jim Crow. Slavery. Don’t Pass It On.com.” It’s the second politically motivated case of billboard vandalism in the Salt Lake area over the last few days. Over the weekend… Read More

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Listen: How the Coronavirus Affects Kids

Early on in the pandemic, it seemed as if kids were spared the worst effects of the coronavirus. But in May, a mysterious illness emerged that affected children and appeared to be linked to the virus. As parents now look to send kids back to school and daycare, how should they think about these risks? What do we now know about this new syndrome? James Hamblin and Katherine Wells are joined on the Social Distance podcast by staff writer Sarah Zhang to discuss. Listen here: Subscribe to Social Distance on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, or another podcast platform to receive new episodes as soon as they’re published. What follows is an… Read More

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