Intel: It’s in the chips as results top forecasts

SANTA CLARA — Led by gains from its data center and personal computer divisions, Intel on Thursday reported better-than-expected second-quarter results and said it expects business to improve throughout the rest of the year. After the stock market closed, Intel reported earnings of $2.81 billion, or 58 cents a share, on revenue of $14.8 billion, up from a profit of $1.33 billion, or 27 cents a share, on $13.5 billion in sales in the same period a year ago. Excluding one-time items, Intel earned 72 cents a share. Related Articles AMD, Facebook rise on strong earnings results Biz Break: Facebook, Intel line up for earnings this week Nvidia starts week… Read More

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Silicon Valley exec denies making sexual harassment claim

SAN FRANCISCO — A San Francisco businessman says he has been falsely accused of using an anonymous blog post to accuse a competitor of sexual harassment. Brandon Katayama Hill, founder and CEO of consulting business btrax, denied the allegations that were brought against him last week in a defamation lawsuit in San Mateo County Superior Court. “I am falsely alleged for things I have never done,” he wrote in an email to this news organization Thursday. “I am working with my attorney to make things clear.” The lawsuit centers on an anonymous blog post titled “Happenings in Silicon Valley — I was sexually taken advantage of by a Silicon Valley… Read More

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How Google is stealthily pushing its employees away from meat

Slowly, steadily and stealthily, Google has been slipping more and more mushrooms into burgers it serves to workers, while cutting back on the meat. That’s according to a new report on worker-feeding habits at the Mountain View tech giant, whose famously free employee cafeterias offer a multitude of cuisines in upscale food court style. “Google has slowly increased the percentage of mushrooms in the patty from 20 percent to 50 percent,” said a Fast Company report. The surreptitious substitution is part of a broader effort to fill Googlers’ bellies with more plant-based foods and less meat, according to the report. …read more Source:: East Bay – Business

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Google grabs dozens of Sunnyvale properties, signaling a major expansion

SUNNYVALE — Google has bought dozens of properties in Sunnyvale’s Moffett Park with a combined value of at least $500 million, a move that sets the stage for a major expansion of the tech titan’s Silicon Valley operations. The search giant has bought a series of aging research, office and industrial buildings in Sunnyvale not far from the company’s Mountain View headquarters and near office towers the firm has leased in recent years. Google, according to this newspaper’s review of Santa Clara County property records, bought numerous properties on July 25 from several different sellers. Those sellers, county records show, are connected to affiliates of CB Richard Ellis, a commercial… Read More

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Amazon’s Jeff Bezos dethrones Bill Gates to become world’s richest person

Talk about Amazon prime: Jeff Bezos is now richer than Bill Gates, which makes him the world’s wealthiest person. The Amazon CEO’s net worth is up to about $91.3 billion because his company shares are surging ahead of its scheduled earnings report Thursday. The net worth of Gates, the Microsoft co-founder who has been the world’s richest person since 2013, is at $90 billion, according to Forbes’ real-time wealth tracker. Amazon shares are rising and Microsoft’s shares are about flat this morning, but even if that changes by the time the stock markets close, Bezos is still likely to overtake Gates in the near future. Online retailer Amazon has been… Read More

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Teck Resources second-quarter results boosted by steelmaking coal business

VANCOUVER — Teck Resources Ltd. (TSX:TECK.B) says its steelmaking coal business helped grow its second-quarter profit to $577 million. The company says the profit amounted to $1 per share for the quarter ended June 30, up from $15 million or three cents per share a year ago. Revenue in the quarter totalled nearly $2.82 billion, up from $1.74 billion. The improvement came as Teck says it set second-quarter steelmaking coal sales and production records of 6.9 million and 6.8 million tonnes and saw gains in prices, offset in part by higher costs. The company also benefited from higher base metal prices and a weaker loonie compared with the U.S. dollar… Read More

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Opinion: Upgrade the GI Bill — we’re not farmers anymore

App developer, robotics technician, digital animator and advanced manufacturer — what do all of these careers have in common? They didn’t exist 73 years ago when the GI Bill was signed into law. When our fighting forces shipped out for World War II nearly a fourth of Americans were farmers. Today, that number is around 0.01 percent. Our economy has undergone radical transformations. With the rise of everything from driverless cars to robotics to artificial intelligence, more changes are to come. It makes you wonder what jobs will exist in 73 years that we can’t imagine today. In fact, research shows that 65 percent of children in elementary school will… Read More

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Group sues Lafayette to stop PG&E from cutting down 272 trees

LAFAYETTE — A group of residents is suing the city to prevent Pacific Gas & Electric from cutting down hundreds of mature redwoods, oaks and other heritage trees. In March, Lafayette approved an agreement allowing PG&E to remove 272 trees on private and public property, including dozens along the Lafayette-Moraga Regional Trail and the Lafayette Reservoir Rim Trail. In a lawsuit filed last month in Contra Costa County Superior Court, Save Lafayette Trees alleges that the city did not evaluate the potential environmental impact of removing the trees. The plaintiffs also contend that Lafayette failed to notify the public before signing off on the deal, thereby violating the general plan… Read More

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Why you still can’t ditch your cable box

NEW YORK (AP) — Not that long ago, the clunky cable box looked like it was on its way out. The federal government was pressuring cable companies to open up their near-monopoly on boxes to more competition, and industry leader Comcast promised apps that could render some boxes obsolete. That was then. Today, the vast majority of customers still need to rent a box to get full service from cable providers, and those box-replacing apps remain elusive. Here’s what happened. DITCHING THE BOX In 2015, tech companies and consumer advocates were pushing the Federal Communications Commission to open up the cable-box market. The goal was to let you buy a… Read More

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Editorial: Can’t let bureaucracy ground important fire-fighting tool

With about 50 wildfires burning in the U.S., the U.S. Forest Service should be making every effort to deploy the most effective firefighting resources available. But it appears red tape is fireproof. In June, the Forest Service offered a contract for tanker aircraft that can drop water or fire suppressant over wide areas, but the contract limited the capacity of the planes to no more than 5,000 gallons. Related Articles Evacuation order for town of Mariposa lifted as Detwiler Fire rages on Bankruptcy may ground air tanker firm Agencies reinstate more air tankers That excluded a modified Boeing 747, operated by Colorado-based Global SuperTanker Services, capable of dropping more than… Read More

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