A B.C. college instructor’s novel life of prison, addiction and recovery

Late one night in June 1988, Geri Bemister smashed in the door of a Victoria pharmacy with a hammer and bolt cutters, grabbed the drugs she knew she could sell, and ran. She was 19, an alcoholic, addict and already entrenched with criminals when that smash-and-grab landed her in a federal prison. It only increased her street credibility and fuelled her fascination with the gang lifestyle. That, in turn, fuelled her addiction, which nearly claimed her life at 35. At that point, her family intervened and got her into rehab. From there, she went on to university as a student and then teacher. Her novel path makes her a uniquely… Read More

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‘Home is where you want to be’: Huntsman program aims to give cancer patients more flexibility

SALT LAKE CITY — Tom Kurrus is not afraid to die. “I have no qualms about the fact that I have a fatal diagnosis,” he says. “But I’m not into suffering.” While his approaching death from cancer doesn’t fill him with dread, “I just don’t want to be there when it happens,” he quipped. Kurrus, a retired internal medicine and infectious disease physician who worked in the field for 43 years, learned in September he had a brain tumor called a glioblastoma. His doctors from the Huntsman Cancer Institute believe he could live anywhere from three months to about a year. “Everybody expects I know what’s going down with this,”… Read More

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China suspends tariff hikes on US cars, auto parts

BEIJING — China announced a 90-day suspension on Friday of tariff hikes on U.S. cars, trucks and auto parts following its cease-fire in a trade battle with Washington that threatens global economic growth. The suspension is China’s first step in response to President Donald Trump’s Dec. 1 agreement to suspend U.S. tariff hikes for a similar 90-day period while the two sides negotiate over American complaints about Beijing’s technology policy and trade surplus. China has indicated it plans to move ahead with the talks despite strains over the arrest of a Chinese technology executive in Canada to face possible U.S. charges related to a violation of trade sanctions on Iran.… Read More

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Bug may have exposed photos from 7M Facebook users

NEW YORK — Facebook’s privacy controls have broken down yet again, this time through a software flaw affecting nearly 7 million users who had photos exposed to a much wider audience than intended. The bug disclosed Friday gave hundreds of apps unauthorized access to photos that could in theory include images that would embarrass some of the affected users. They also included photos people may have uploaded but hadn’t yet posted, perhaps because they had changed their mind. It’s not yet known whether anyone actually saw the photos, but the revelation of the now-fixed problem served as another reminder of just how much data Facebook has on its 2.27 billion… Read More

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Facebook says bug may have exposed photos on 7M users

NEW YORK — Facebook says a software bug affecting nearly 7 million users may have exposed a broader set of photos to app developers than what these users intended. Although this doesn’t mean the photos were actually seen by anyone, the fact that the bug even existed offers a reminder of just how much data Facebook has on its 2.27 billion users and how often these sorts of slipups happen. In a blog post Friday, the company said the bug affected 6.8 million people who granted permission for third-party apps to access the photos. Facebook said the bug existed for 12 days in September and has been fixed. Generally when… Read More

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China suspends tariff hikes on $126B of US cars, auto parts

BEIJING — China announced a 90-day suspension on Friday of tariff hikes on $126 billion of U.S. cars, trucks and auto parts following its cease-fire in a trade battle with Washington that threatens global economic growth. The suspension is China’s first step in response to President Donald Trump’s Dec. 1 agreement to suspend U.S. tariff hikes for a similar 90-day period while the two sides negotiate over American complaints about Beijing’s technology policy and trade surplus. China has indicated it plans to move ahead with the talks despite strains over the arrest of a Chinese technology executive in Canada to face possible U.S. charges related to a violation of trade… Read More

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Broughton-area First Nations reach deal with B.C. government on fish farms

Three First Nations have come to an agreement with the B.C. provincial government regarding the future of ocean-based salmon farming in the Broughton Archipelago. The Kwikwasut’inuxw Haxwa’mis, ‘Namgis and Mamalilikulla First Nations had demanded the removal of salmon farms placed in their traditional territories. Protestors occupied Marine Harvest farms at Midsummer Island and Swanson Island last summer and fall. They were ordered to leave by the courts, but their activism earned them a visit from Premier John Horgan and Agriculture Minister Lana Popham and a commitment to consultation, nation-to-nation. “We are looking forward to making that consultation process government to government and we are looking for a starting point,” said… Read More

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B.C. forest industry wraps Asia trade mission in China after minister pulls out

VANCOUVER — Delegates from British Columbia’s forest industry have concluded what they characterize as a successful trade mission to Asia despite tensions over the arrest of Huawei chief financial officer Meng Wanzhou in Canada. Forests Minister Doug Donaldson visited Korea and Japan with the delegates but pulled out of the China leg of the tour this week. He said it wouldn’t be prudent for a government representative to travel to the country. The BC Council of Forest Industries says in a news release that delegates spent Wednesday through Friday in China and focused throughout the Asia trip on new opportunities to advance wood construction. Council CEO Susan Yurkovich says the… Read More

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Register now for Utah Entrepreneur Challenge

SALT LAKE CITY — Registration for the 2018-19 Utah Entrepreneur Challenge, a statewide business model competition, is now open to all university students in Utah. Teams compete for $100,000 in cash and in-kind prizes, including a $40,000 grand prize. The registration deadline is Thursday, Feb. 14. The competition is managed by the Lassonde Entrepreneur Institute, an interdisciplinary division of the David Eccles School of Business at the University of Utah, and sponsored by Zions Bank. To participate, students can visit the event website at lassonde.utah.edu/uec to download the competition packet and apply online. Students must submit a written business model. The top 20 teams will be selected based on their… Read More

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From zero to 400 mph in two seconds, abort motor test ignites northern Utah sky

PROMONTORY, Box Elder County — Blasting off into orbit is risky even under the best of conditions, and making sure the engines responsible for protecting astronauts can operate even in frigid cold weather is one way to mitigate the inherent danger of human space exploration. On Thursday, Northrop Grumman conducted a ground test of its launch abort motor that will be used for NASA’s Orion spacecraft — an effort to ensure astronaut safety in case of a worst-case scenario during launch or early stages of flight. The Orion spacecraft is designed to carry a crew and launch on NASA’s heavy-lift Space Launch System for missions beyond the moon. This particular… Read More

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