Lawsuit brought by Microsoft, others over Trump’s DACA cancelation heads to the Supreme Court

Microsoft Attorney Josh Rosenkranz and President Brad Smith take questions on the Supreme Court steps following a hearing on government surveillance. (Microsoft Photo) The DACA lawsuit Microsoft and Princeton University brought will be considered by the Supreme Court. The court will decide whether President Donald Trump acted lawfully when he canceled the status of DACA — Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals — recipients back in 2017. The Obama-era policy allowed undocumented immigrants brought to the U.S. as children to work and live in the U.S. without the threat of deportation. When Trump rolled back the policy, a number of plaintiffs sued, including Microsoft, Princeton, several states, and civil rights groups.… Read More

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The next AWS? Amazon emerges as a logistics heavyweight as it owns more delivery infrastructure

Last year, Amazon announced a new program to have tens of thousands of drivers delivering packages in Prime-branded uniforms and vans through independent delivery companies. (GeekWire Photo / Kurt Schlosser) Amazon is taking more and more control of how its packages are shipped to customers — and it could have big implications for the global logistics industry. The Seattle tech giant has historically relied on partners such as FedEx, UPS, and USPS to help deliver its packages. But the company is now investing heavily in its own cargo jets, trailer trucks, and related infrastructure to help support its Prime fast-shipping program. New data from Rakuten Intelligence shows that Amazon now… Read More

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The Green New Deal Finally Makes a Debate Appearance

A number of Democratic primary candidates have endorsed the Green New Deal or something like it. But the first person to actually mention it on the debate stage either Wednesday or Thursday night was Senator Kamala Harris of California. Asked by Chuck Todd to describe her climate-change plan, she replied briskly and corrected his terms: The rapid warming of the planet should be called the “climate crisis,” because “it’s an existential threat to us as a species.” She mentioned visiting the site of last year’s wildfires in California’s “while the embers were smoldering.” “That’s why I support a Green New Deal,” she said. “It’s why on day one as president,… Read More

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Amazon emerges as tech industry villain in Democratic debates

Andrew Yang greets supporters during a Seattle campaign stop. (GeekWire Photo / Todd Bishop) In the cumulative four hours of Democratic primary debates this week, just one tech company was mentioned by name. Amazon was name-checked in both nights of debates by candidates competing for the Democratic nomination in the 2020 presidential election. Who said what: In the first debate Wednesday, Sen. Elizabeth Warren’s ambitious proposal to break up Big Tech was the subject of one of the questions, though it was aimed at Sen. Cory Booker. “I will single out companies like Halliburton or Amazon that pay nothing in taxes and our need to change that,” Booker said when… Read More

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Stackery CEO steps down as serverless technology startup seeks new leader for its next phase

Nate Taggart, co-founder and CEO, Stackery (Stackery Photo) Stackery CEO and co-founder Nate Taggart is leaving the serverless software development startup, telling employees in a message that he believes the Portland-based company needs a different leader for its next phase of growth. “The startup that we’ve built together now works with some of the largest companies in the world and the incredible growth that we’ve seen over the last two quarters is a clear reflection of the value we’ve created for our customers,” Taggart wrote in the message, which was posted online by Stackery on Thursday. “This success now affords me an opportunity to step aside so that Stackery can… Read More

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Seattle mayor explains strategy behind tech blitz after visiting Apple, Expedia, Amazon in one week

Amazon real estate chief John Schoettler and Seattle Mayor Jenny Durkan tour the company’s new Re:Invent building. Behind them, a sign reads “Welcome to Amazon Mayor Durkan!!!” (GeekWire Photo / Monica Nickelsburg) Giant tech companies have dramatically reshaped Seattle — in some cases creating entire neighborhoods — and they’re just getting started. While many Seattleites are wary of more growth in an already congested city, Mayor Jenny Durkan is welcoming the next wave of development with open arms. In the past four days, Durkan has paid a visit to three campuses under construction that will house some of the biggest names in tech: Apple, Expedia, and Amazon. Her enthusiasm for… Read More

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As demand for learning English grows, Seattle’s Lana pairs native speakers with students via video

Part of the Lana team from left to right: Cynthia Hannon, chief operating officer; Paul Neville, CEO and co-founder; Tina Tran Neville, co-founder; Makayla Sonstelie; Zhuo Shan; Sarthak Turkhia; Juan Acevedo; and Yash Vig. These team members alone represent four ethnicities and 10 languages spoken. (Lana Photo) When Tina Tran Neville launched her third startup in October, she wasn’t going to repeat the mistake that sank her second company. A mismatch between the product and market had quickly torpedoed her earlier ed-tech venture. So last year when she and her husband Paul started Lana, a Seattle-based company that teaches people to speak, read and write English, they started with off-the-shelf… Read More

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NASA picks Dragonfly mission to send a nuclear drone to Saturnian moon Titan

An artist’s conception shows the Dragonfly probe on the dunes of Titan. (NASA / JHUAPL Illustration) NASA has chosen to commit up to $850 million to creating an interplanetary probe unlike any seen before: a rotor-equipped spacecraft that will fly through the smoggy atmosphere of Titan, Saturn’s biggest moon. The Dragonfly mission will be managed by Johns Hopkins University’s Applied Physics Laboratory on NASA’s behalf, with its launch scheduled for 2026 on a rocket to be named later, and its landing due amid the dunes of Titan in 2034. This won’t be the first landing on Titan: That happened back in 2005, when the Cassini spacecraft dropped off the Huygens… Read More

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Big debut: Shares of Adaptive Biotechnologies rise 100% on first day as public company

Adaptive rang the opening bell at the Nasdaq stock exchange on Thursday. (Adaptive Photo) Adaptive Biotechnologies had a heck of a first day as a public company. Shares of the Seattle-based biotech, which makes technology to diagnose and treat diseases by reading the immune system, rose more than 100 percent on Thursday in the second-biggest first-day IPO spikes of 2019. Adaptive’s stock closed out the day at $40.30 per share, compared with the $20 IPO price. Shares continued climbing in after-hours trading. Only Beyond Meat had a better first-day performance, closing up 163 percent the day after its IPO last month. In third place is Alzheimer’s drugmaker Cortexyme, which rose… Read More

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When Research Data Escapes the University

If there are 20 people in a coffee shop, then there are at least 21 cameras: One embedded in each phone, and, usually at least, one tucked high in the corner. What you say may be overheard and tweeted; you might even appear in the background of another’s patron’s selfie or Skype session. But that doesn’t stop even the most privacy-wary people from entering coffee shops. They accept the risk inherent in entering a public place. This notion—of a “reasonable” expectation of privacy—guides researchers hoping to observe subjects in public. But the very idea of what’s reasonable is a complicated one. Faculty at three universities—Duke, Stanford, and University of Colorado… Read More

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