Postal Service features photo by Monterey Bay Aquarium scientist on stamp

Moss Landing – On the day the U.S. Postal Service first issued its Bioluminescent Life stamps series, Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute senior scientist/marine biologist Steve Haddock said it’s just starting to sink in that his work will be memorialized on a postage stamp. “There have been articles with the New York Times about our research and National Geographic articles but not quite like this,” he said. Haddock, 52, said he’s hopeful the stamps will expose a larger swath of people to deep sea life. “I think the (stamps can build) an appreciation that there are these weird creatures out there, but also that so many of them can make… Read More

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Breathing new life into Seattle’s aged Pacific Science Center by running it like a startup

Pacific Science Center CEO Will Daugherty talks with Nick Ulring, a VR environmental artist with Hyperspace XR, about the startup’s construction of a VR experience at the Pacific Science Center. (GeekWire Photo / Lisa Stiffler) Is it possible to revitalize a beloved but frumpy 56-year-old organization by running it like a startup? Will Daugherty says yes. Pacific Science Center CEO Will Daugherty. (Pacific Science Center Photo) Since taking the helm of Seattle’s Pacific Science Center two years ago, the former tech leader has worked to infuse the educational nonprofit with a scrappy, git-‘er-done entrepreneurial spirit. And it seems to be working. The Science Center has created new programs to boost… Read More

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Pittsburgh Profile: Seattle native Cathy Wissnick leads Microsoft’s civic engagement in the Steel City

Cathy Wissnick speaks at a Microsoft event in Cambridge, Mass. in 2016. (Photo via Reba Saldanha) Cathy Wissnick moved to Pittsburgh only four months ago but she’s already experienced the collaborative nature of the Steel City. That’s important for Wissnick, a director of technology and civic engagement for Microsoft who is leading the company’s outreach in Pittsburgh. “Moving to Pittsburgh and knowing next to no one, it meant a lot that people were very willing to take a meeting, and pass me on to someone else in their network,” she said. “Within two weeks of landing here, I had met with leaders in the business and civic community, and been… Read More

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The Wizard of Arts: Karla Boos and the Quantum Theatre Company use tech to stage plays anywhere

Quantum Theatre’s production of Tom Stoppard’s “The Hard Problem” at Pittsburgh’s Energy Innovation Center, Daina Michelle Griffith, Fredi Bernstein, Vinny Anand, Andrew William Smith and Claire Hsu. (John Altdorfer Photo) PITTSBURGH — Karla Boos describes herself as a high-level, outside-the-box wizard. For the past 27 years, as the founder and artistic director of the Quantum Theatre Company in Pittsburgh, Boos has been waving her magic wand and pulling rabbits out of the hat, staging original productions of plays in unorthodox and often technically challenging spaces throughout the city. Always on the lookout for the perfect place for the next play, Quantum has moved from venue to venue, producing more than… Read More

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The City That Remembers Everything

The most impressive technical feat of James Joyce’s novel Ulysses is that it manages to record nearly every detail from a day in the life of the book’s protagonist, Leopold Bloom, and to elevate those events to the status of literature. Mythology, even. Readers track Bloom’s journey step by step, as he navigates the labyrinthine streets, pubs, and offices of Dublin, yet Bloom’s errands bear the symbolic weight of The Odyssey. Ulysses battled his way from island to island, fighting witches and monsters, but Ulysses suggests that modern, urban lives might be just as significant. Recording stray thoughts, private conversations, newspaper headlines, and even an amorous act in the bedroom,… Read More

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Inside the mind of Duolingo CEO Luis von Ahn as $700M language learning startup eyes IPO in 2020

Duolingo CEO and co-founder Luis von Ahn inside his company’s Pittsburgh HQ, where more than 100 employees help develop language learning technology. (GeekWire Photo / Taylor Soper) PITTSBURGH — At times, it’s hard to keep up with Luis von Ahn. The Duolingo CEO and co-founder speaks quickly, ideas flowing out of a mind that helped the Guatemalan native win the MacArthur Fellowship, also known as the “genius grant,” in 2006. But inside a conference room at Duolingo’s headquarters in Pittsburgh, our back-and-forth chatter is replaced by brief silence. Asked for thoughts on improving public education around the world, given his experience building a language learning startup for the past seven… Read More

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Nightfall in Bellevue: Destiny 2 update will bring scoring changes to popular online game

Bungie Image Bellevue, Wash.-based game developer Bungie has made a reputation for itself over the last couple of decades by, well, taking over the known universe once every couple of years. Its current bid for world domination is Destiny 2, the Activision-published massively-multiplayer-online first-person shooter, and it’s preparing for the imminent release of patch 1.1.3 on Feb. 27. In the regular This Week at Bungie blog, Bungie’s community manager “dmg04” disclosed the current development roadmap for Destiny 2 and discussed the biggest new feature coming in next Tuesday’s patch: Nightfall Challenge Cards, several changes to how players score points in Nightfall raids, and a series of tweaks to how the… Read More

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Martins Beach: Silicon Valley billionaire takes case to U.S. Supreme Court

In a direct challenge to California’s landmark law guaranteeing public access to beaches, Silicon Valley billionaire Vinod Khosla on Thursday filed an appeal with the U.S. Supreme Court, arguing that he should not be required to allow public access to Martins Beach in San Mateo County. Khosla, in his petition for the nation’s highest court to take up the case, argued it was a violation of his property rights for the California Coastal Commission to require that he obtain a permit after he purchased 89 acres surrounding the beach south of Half Moon Bay in 2009 and padlocked the gates to shoreline over an area that families had used for… Read More

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Airbus’ Vahana venture shows off video of its flying car’s first test flight in Oregon

News brief: Vahana, the Airbus-backed venture that’s developing a fleet of electric-powered air taxis, shared the results of its first flight test amid the prairies of eastern Oregon three weeks ago. But now there’s video showing the Alpha One octocopter landing on its airstrip at the Pendleton UAS Test Range. “During our minute-long flight, the primary battery system used about 8 percent of its total energy, demonstrating that the vehicle is capable of much more,” Vahana CEO Zach Lovering said today in a blog posting. Lovering said that the flight test campaign is continuing, and he promises further updates. Watch Wired’s extended-play version of the video, and stay tuned for… Read More

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Event technology startup eventcore raises $4.1M to fuel national expansion

The Zillow Premier Agent Forum, an event that eventcore worked on.(Kevin Lisota Photo) Eventcore, a Seattle startup focused on event planning and management, has raised $4.1 million to grow on a national level. Alan Frazier’s East Seattle Partners led the funding round. Nick Zabriskie, a partner at East Seattle Partners, will join eventcore’s Board of Directors. Mark Johnson, eventcore CEO. (eventcore Photo) The cash infusion allows the 46-person company to a national sales and marketing presence speed up product development. Up until now, eventcore primarily focused on the West Coast, but it aims to gain a national foothold with these moves. Eventcore has been around since the 1980s, focusing purely… Read More

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