Why Is Turkey in NATO Anyway?

“We think that this is a bad idea.” A senior State Department officials told reporters yesterday that the Turkish attacks on northeastern Syria, targeting Kurdish fighters who have been America’s best partners defeating ISIS in the country, would help no one—not even Turkey. “This will not increase their security, our security, or the security of anybody else in the region.” Donald Trump, after a call with the Turkish president on Sunday, had promptly moved U.S. troops out of the area, clear of the coming bombardment. Otherwise, they risked death at the hands of a NATO ally. But what kind of ally forces Americans to flee from their friend’s American-made F-16s?… Read More

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To Fight or to Flee

If you ask an Istanbullu where to find plant food or pesticide, you will be directed to a shopping arcade in an underpass beside the Galata Bridge, in the neighborhood of Karaköy, where these items are sold in rows of identical shops. Fishing equipment is sold a few blocks over, where nets and harpoons hang from awnings and mannequins in wetsuits clutter the sidewalks. A little farther along are the shops that sell construction supplies, crowded together along the narrow streets of the Perşembe Pazarı, one after another, hard to tell apart. Neighborhoods like these are vestiges of another age in the timeworn city, before the internet and the phone… Read More

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Hong Kong’s Worsening Press Climate

HONG KONG—Police officers here have made an art of kettling, or encircling, their quarry. Usually the police trap and funnel large groups of people inside a park, or a shopping mall, and bar them from leaving. Those inside are not under arrest, and yet they are not free to go. As protests in this city have entered their fifth month, police tactics have grown more sudden, more violent, and more arbitrary against civilian demonstrators and the press. Local journalists bear the overwhelming brunt of police pressure, but international reporters have not been spared, either. I know firsthand what this is like, and not in the way I had expected when… Read More

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Photos of the Week: Ute Muster, Snow Leopard, Highway Acrobat

Jam Sta Rosa / AFP via Getty A dog exhibition in Bishkek, the World Athletics Championships in Doha, a Kali Uchis performance in Texas, Extinction Rebellion protests in Australia, a demon king burning in India, attacks on Kurdish sites in Syria, unrest in Haiti, the Masham Sheep Fair in England, rice harvest in China, new public artwork in Paris, and much more. …read more Source:: The Atlantic – Global       

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China’s Might Claims Another Victim—the NBA

For all the concern about military confrontation in the South China Sea, economic leverage might be the most powerful weapon in Beijing’s arsenal. It is deployed more effectively, or at least more often, than all the missiles, tanks, and artillery in the People’s Liberation Army. If power is the ability to force others to do what you want them to do, then China exerts its power with yuan more than with bullets. And its capacity to make one of the world’s most celebrated sports leagues beseech forgiveness of a noncrime is a case study in how it’s done. On October 4, Daryl Morey, the general manager of the National Basketball… Read More

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When GoFundMe Gets Ugly

In June 2016, Chauncy Black rode the bus from his home in South Memphis to one of the city’s whiter, wealthier neighborhoods. The 16-year-old helped his grandmother pay the bills by doing odd jobs for neighbors, and on this afternoon he was headed for the rich-person Kroger supermarket to try something new: approaching shoppers who’d just bought hundreds of dollars’ worth of groceries and offering to take their bags to the car for a few bucks. It had seemed like a good idea, but in practice it was dispiriting. People ignored him; they wouldn’t even look him in the eye. Sometime after 9 p.m., Chauncy filled a box with a… Read More

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When GoFundMe Gets Ugly

In June 2016, Chauncy Black rode the bus from his home in South Memphis to one of the city’s whiter, wealthier neighborhoods. The 16-year-old helped his grandmother pay the bills by doing odd jobs for neighbors, and on this afternoon he was headed for the rich-person Kroger supermarket to try something new: approaching shoppers who’d just bought hundreds of dollars’ worth of groceries and offering to take their bags to the car for a few bucks. It had seemed like a good idea, but in practice it was dispiriting. People ignored him; they wouldn’t even look him in the eye. Sometime after 9 p.m., Chauncy filled a box with a… Read More

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The Unending Disquiet After Attacks in Paris

In comparison to the murderous years of 2015 and 2016, when terrorists killed more than 200 people in Paris and Nice and wounded hundreds of others, last week’s attack at the French capital’s police headquarters, in which four people died, was almost modest, if grim. The assault lasted all of seven minutes. The city wasn’t put on lockdown. And yet it may turn out to be France’s most dangerous attack yet, because it struck the heart of the French state. Its perpetrator, a convert to Islam who was shot dead during the attack, was a computer technician with a security clearance and access to the confidential files of high-profile terrorism… Read More

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A Very Incoherent Syria Policy

In times of policy confusion, there’s a stock phrase some Trump officials reach for, almost like a mantra: “We’ve been very clear.” Trying to explain why the president seemed to be opening the way for Turkey to attack America’s Syrian Kurdish partners, a senior administration official intoned it again and again: Trump wasn’t endorsing an invasion; he was just moving a handful of troops out of the way in case there was one. The confusion, of course, came from a sudden Sunday-night statement from the White House, which said Turkey was set to invade northeastern Syria and the president wouldn’t leave U.S. troops there to get involved. Swift, severe, and… Read More

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Everyone’s Hoping an Election Will End the Brexit Crisis. It Won’t.

Tired and frustrated, trust in each other all but gone, Britain and the European Union are on the brink of throwing away three years of painstaking work setting out the terms of their separation over a fundamental—and important—point of principle that both sides refuse to abandon: sovereignty. The United Kingdom and the EU now have barely a week to agree on a compromise that would determine the rules of Britain’s departure from the bloc before a complex and unpredictable series of events is set in motion, almost certainly ending with a British general election. Should a divorce deal not be reached, Prime Minister Boris Johnson would likely have to ask… Read More

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