Brain-eating amoeba kills a 6-year-old boy in Texas, prompting officials to test the water supply to 8 cities

Summary List Placement The death of a 6-year-old boy alerted Texas officials to the presence of a brain-eating amoeba in their water supply. The Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ) has issued a water advisory to residents of eight cities that are served by the Brazosport Water Authority, according to CNN. People were warned not to ingest any water because it contained a deadly microscopic organism called Naegleria fowleri. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says this amoeba can be traced to soil and warm freshwater, which includes rivers, hot springs, and lakes, as well as insufficiently chlorinated swimming pools and heated tap water. Contaminated water typically enters a… Read More

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Report highlights impacts of changing climate on B.C. Interior forests landscape

The dry Douglas fir forests of B.C.’s Interior offer a stark illustration of how climate change is going to alter the province’s landscape, as well as the forest sector’s shortcomings in looking after the woods, according to new research by the B.C. Forest Practices Board. Technically, the region is referred to as the Interior Douglas Fir (IDF) biogeoclimatic zone, an area of dry forest and grassy understory that covers a swath of the Interior that stretches from the Kootenays and the Okanagan up into the Cariboo plateau. It covers five per cent of the province now, but shifting climatic conditions are expected to nearly double it in size over the… Read More

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Report highlights impacts of changing climate on B.C. Interior forests landscape

The dry Douglas fir forests of B.C.’s Interior offer a stark illustration of how climate change is going to alter the province’s landscape, as well as the forest sector’s shortcomings in looking after the woods, according to new research by the B.C. Forest Practices Board. Technically, the region is referred to as the Interior Douglas Fir (IDF) biogeoclimatic zone, an area of dry forest and grassy understory that covers a swath of the Interior that stretches from the Kootenays and the Okanagan up into the Cariboo plateau. It covers five per cent of the province now, but shifting climatic conditions are expected to nearly double it in size over the… Read More

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Beautiful Day artwork finds permanent home in Squamish

When Tsawaysia Spukwus, a Squamish Nation artist and drum maker, offers protocol welcomes at ceremonies and events, the first words she always says are, Halth skwile te-staas (It’s a beautiful day, today). When an Australian-born text-based artist, Kristin McIver, visited Squamish as an artist in residence at Quest University during the …read more Source:: Vancouver Sun – Entertainment       

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Beautiful Day artwork finds permanent home in Squamish

When Tsawaysia Spukwus, a Squamish Nation artist and drum maker, offers protocol welcomes at ceremonies and events, the first words she always says are, Halth skwile te-staas (It’s a beautiful day, today). When an Australian-born text-based artist, Kristin McIver, visited Squamish as an artist in residence at Quest University during the …read more Source:: Vancouver Sun – Entertainment       

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Trump denies New York Times report detailing his tax returns and financial problems: ‘It’s totally fake news’

Summary List Placement President Donald Trump on Sunday evening dismissed a damning report by The New York Times on his tax returns as “fake news.” “It’s totally fake news. Made up, fake,” Trump said. “Actually, I paid tax.” The bombshell article revealed that the president paid only $750 in federal income tax in both 2016 and 2017. For 10 of the last 15 years, he paid no federal income taxes at all, according to the report. The Times also discovered that Trump spent a whopping $70,000 to have his hair styled for “The Apprentice,” and benefited from a massive tax refund of $72.9 million in 2010 that is the subject… Read More

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Rooftop solar: What’s its value and what is fair? Much at stake in Utah rate case

Dom Ontiveros, of Auric Energy, installs a solar panel on the 1,000th home that utilized the Empower SLC Solar program in Salt Lake City on Thursday, Nov. 14, 2019. Empower SLC Solar, a community-led program in Salt Lake County, helps residents overcome the logistical and financial hurdles of going solar. | Laura Seitz, Deseret News Public Service Commission will weigh issue SALT LAKE CITY — Solar advocates say a proposal by Rocky Mountain Power to decrease the amount it pays future rooftop solar owners for excess energy is a threat to more development of the renewable energy resource and will deter additional investments by Utah customers. A rate case on… Read More

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Company tests algae solution that could be both short- and long-term fix for Utah Lake

Ryan Van Goethem, of SePro, demonstrates the use of a Secchi disk to measure the water clarity as the company works to treat an algal bloom at Utah Lake on Friday, Sept. 4, 2020. | Scott G Winterton, Deseret News SPANISH FORK — Mike Pearce believes his company has a solution many doctors would envy: a cure that fixes the problem while also masking its symptoms. Of course, the company he works for is in the sustainable solutions business, not the medical field, and instead of treating a human patient, it is instead working to fix Utah Lake. SePRO is one of two companies that began treatments on Utah Lake… Read More

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